Archives par mot-clé : Viêt-Nam

Christopher Goscha : The Penguin History of Modern Vietnam

[ndlr] A paraître le 30 juin 2016. Le nouvel ouvrage de Christopher Goscha, professeur à l’UQAM (Montréal), sur l’histoire du Viêt-Nam, une somme de 672 p. Présentation de l’éditeur.

Goscha_ThePenguinHistoryofModernVietnam_2016

Over the centuries the Vietnamese have beenboth colonizers themselves and the victims of colonization by others. Their country expanded, shrunk, split and sometimes disappeared, often under circumstances far beyond their control. Despite these often overwhelming pressures, Vietnam has survived as one of Asia’s most striking and complex cultures.

As more and more visitors come to this extraordinary country, there has been for some years a need for a major history – a book which allows the outsider to understand the many layers left by earlier emperors, rebels, priests and colonizers. Christopher Goscha’s new work amply fills this role. Drawing on a lifetime of thinking about Indo-China, he has created a narrative which is consistently seen from ‘inside’ Vietnam but never loses sight of the connections to the ‘outside’. As wave after wave of invaders – whether Chinese, French, Japanese or American – have been ultimately expelled, we see the terrible cost to the Vietnamese themselves. Vietnam’s role in one of the Cold War’s longest conflicts has meant that its past has been endlessly abused for propaganda purposes and it is perhaps only now that the events which created the modern state can be seen from a truly historical perspective.

Christopher Goscha draws on the latest research and discoveries in Vietnamese, French and English. His book is a major achievement, describing both the grand narrative of Vietnam’s story but also the byways, curiosities, differences, cultures and peoples that have done so much over the centuries to define the many versions of Vietnam.

ChristopherGoscha_portraitChristopher Goscha is professor of history at the University of Quebec at Montreal. He has spent much of his adult life studying the people, politics and history of Southeast Asia, particularly Thailand, Cambodia, Laos and Vietnam. He studied at Georgetown University and the Ecole Pratique des Hautes Etudes (IVème Section, La Sorbonne, Paris). He has written extensively about many of the different regions of Indo-China.

Source : Penguin

 

Tâm T. T. Ngô: The New Way – Protestantism and the Hmong in Vietnam

[ndlr] Nouvelle publication sur la religion et la communauté Hmong au Viêt-Nam. Présentation de l’éditeur.

Tam T. T. Ngo, The New Way: Protestantism and the Hmong in Vietnam, Seattle, University of Washington Press, 2016.

TamTTNgo_TheNewWay

In the mid-1980s, a radio program with a compelling spiritual message was accidentally received by listeners in Vietnam’s remote northern highlands. The Protestant evangelical communication had been created in the Hmong language by the Far East Broadcasting Company specifically for war refugees in Laos. The Vietnamese Hmong related the content to their traditional expectation of salvation by a Hmong messiah-king who would lead them out of subjugation, and they appropriated the evangelical message for themselves.

Today, the New Way (Kev Cai Tshiab) has some three hundred thousand followers in Vietnam. Tam T. T. Ngo reveals the complex politics of religion and ethnic relations in contemporary Vietnam and illuminates the dynamic interplay between local and global forces, socialist and postsocialist state building, cold war and post-cold war antagonisms, Hmong transnationalism, and U.S.-led evangelical expansionism.

Tam T. T. Ngo is a research fellow in the department of religious diversity at the Max Planck Institute for the Study of Religious and Ethnic Diversity in Germany.

* * *

“Conversion to evangelical Protestantism by members of the Hmong community in Vietnam raises a host of questions: the impact of conversion on individual converts and non-converts; the relationship between Protestant eschatology and Hmong millenarianism; relations between the Hmong and the state; the transformation of this marginal community into the center of the Hmong diasporic imagination through radio broadcasts and US-based missionaries. This ethnographically rich and theoretically sophisticated study is a major contribution to a wide range of disciplines.”
-Hue-Tam Ho-Tai, Harvard University

 Source : University of Washington Press

Hoang Ngo: Building a New House for the Buddha: Buddhist Social Engagement and Revival in Vietnam, 1927-1951 – PhD

[ndlr] Presentation de Christoph Giebel de la thèse de Hoang Ngo sur le bouddhisme socialement engagé des années 1927-1951, une période rarement considérée. Chronique publiée avec l’autorisation de son auteur.

Ref.: Hoang Ngo, Building a New House for the Buddha: Buddhist Social Engagement and Revival in Vietnam, 1927-1951, Chair: Christoph Giebel.

Now that most of us have begun the new academic year around the world, I am very pleased to make the following announcement:

Recently, in the University of Washington (Seattle) History department, Hoang Ngo successfully defended his dissertation “Building a New House for the Buddha: Buddhist Social Engagement and Revival in Vietnam, 1927-1951.”  The dissertation is based on extensive archival and library research in Viet Nam and France; it was supervised by Laurie Sears, Raymond Jonas, and Christoph Giebel (chair), and earlier also by Professor Emeritus Charles “Biff” Keyes.

The dissertation investigates in particular social engagement of Vietnamese Buddhists, in itself the product of the Buddhist revival emerging in the 1920s. During the revival, Vietnamese Buddhists attempted to remake their religion into a this-worldly Buddhism, establishing Buddhist associations and monastic schools and publishing periodicals to propagate the Dharma. Their goal was to use Buddhism to effectively deal with the colonization of the country by the French and the challenges posed by colonial modernity.

Hoang follows in great detail the debates within and among the emerging Buddhist associations of Cochinchina, Annam, and Tonkin, particularly during the 1930s and early 1940s when new ideas and profound change caused much excitement and activities as well as great anxieties and self-doubt.  What was the best way to propagate the Dharma among the masses?  How could one separate the “true” monk from the “fake”?  What was to be the proper balance between the sangha and the laity?  How could Buddhist associations organize themselves and operate effectively within an all-encompassing colonial order of control?  What role was there for revived Buddhism in the national(ist) struggle?  These and other questions fueled an explosion of intense debates, both in personal interactions as well as in various print media, over doctrinal, organizational and institutional aspects of Buddhism.

Despite personal and institutional rivalries, tensions between leading monks,  newly empowered lay people, and French authority, and persistent regional divisions, the ideal of a unified, all-Vietnamese Buddhist organization remained a long-standing, if elusive goal.  Unity, however, would come about only in the twilight of the colonial empire and the early years of the Cold War, and via the catalyst of the World Buddhist Conference in Sri Lanka.  In an epilogue, Hoang links the (short-lived) moment of unity in 1951 to the Buddhist Struggle Movement in the 1960s Republic, the subject of his earlier, pre-dissertation work.  At the end of a rigorous and vigorous defense, Hoang’s committee urged him to turn this important and richly documented dissertation into a full-fledged book manuscript.

Congratulations to Dr. Hoang Ngo!
C. Giebel

UW-Seattle, USA

Source : VSG

Thèse en ligne (PDF) téléchargeable sur le site de l’Université de Washington : https://digital.lib.washington.edu/researchworks/handle/1773/33976

Gregg Huff: Vietnam’s 1944-1945 Famine – Explanations, Responsibility and Revolution

[ndlr] Séminaire de l’IAO.

Mercredi 08 juin 2016
Salle de réunion de l’IAO (R66), de 14h à 15h30

“Vietnam’s 1944-1945 Famine : Explanations, Responsibility and Revolution”

Gregg Huff, Pembroke College, University of Oxford, England

This paper provides the first quantitative analysis of Vietnam’s 1944-1945 great famine which claimed the lives of over a million people in Tonkin and North Annam and was instrumental in the August 1945 Viet Minh and communist revolution. Competing and hitherto unsatisfactory explanations have put the famine down to the weather, French or Japanese administrative failures, and US aerial bombardment. I show that famine, although made worse by wartime events, resulted from successive typhoons that struck coastal areas and was caused by a consequent food availability deficit. Econometric analysis reveals that differences in endowments and entitlements largely explain who died.

SeminaireIAO_2016_06_08

Source : IAO

Image “à la une” : photographie de Vo An Ninh, témoin de la famine en 1945 : Tận mắt xem 19 bức ảnh về nạn đói năm 1945 của cố nghệ sĩ Võ An Ninh (Giao Duc Viet Nam, 11/06/2012)

Bradley Camp Davis : Imperial Bandits – Outlaws and Rebels in the China-Vietnam Borderlands

[ndlr] Ouvrage à paraître, présentation de l’éditeur.

BradleyCampDavis_ImperialBanditsThe Black Flags raided their way from southern China into northern Vietnam, competing during the second half of the nineteenth century against other armed migrants and uplands communities for the control of commerce, specifically opium, and natural resources, such as copper. At the edges of three empires (the Qing empire in China, the Vietnamese empire governed by the Nguyen dynasty, and, eventually, French Colonial Vietnam), the Black Flags and their rivals sustained networks of power and dominance through the framework of political regimes. This lively history demonstrates the plasticity of borderlines, the limits of imposed boundaries, and the flexible division between apolitical banditry and political rebellion in the borderlands of China and Vietnam.

Imperial Bandits contributes to the ongoing reassessment of borderland areas as frontiers for state expansion, showing that, as a setting for many forms of human activity, borderlands continue to exist well after the establishment of formal boundaries.

Bradley Camp Davis is assistant professor of history at Eastern Connecticut State University.

 

Le Hong Hiep : Obama’s Visit to Vietnam Gave Many Important Immediate and Long-term Outcomes

[ndlr] Signalement d’une analyse de Le Hong Hiep (ISEAS) sur les nouvelles perspectives américano-vietnamiennes.

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

• The milestone visit by US President Barrack Obama to Vietnam on 22-25 June 2016 gave immediate and important results.

• Most noteworthy was the decision by the US to fully lift its long-standing lethal arms embargo on Vietnam. Other significant outcomes include Vietjet’s contract to buy 100 aircraft from Boeing; Vietnam’s granting of a license for the establishment of the US-funded Fulbright University Vietnam; and Vietnam’s formal permission for the US Peace Corps to operate in the country.

• The military impact of the lifting of the embargo is limited, however, as Vietnam is unlikely to enter into any major arms deal with the US any time soon. For now, instead of importing US weapons, Hanoi will probably focus on acquiring US military equipment to enhance its maritime capabilities.

• However, the indication of a stronger rapprochement between the two countries, tending towards a de facto security partnership, has political and strategic implications that are more important than military ones.

• This should worry China more than the arms that Vietnam may purchase from the US after the ban is removed.

• The lifting of the ban will have minimal military impact on other ASEAN member states, however, and the deepened relationship between Hanoi and Washington can be expected to either add momentum to the strengthening of US-ASEAN ties or further polarize ASEAN countries, especially if Beijing responds by expanding its strategic influence over some of them.

LeHongHiep_ObamasVisitToVietnam_ISEAS_no29-2016Cliquez sur l’image pour accéder au PDF

Source : ISEAS Perspective

Vietnam: les dissidents donnent de la voix avant la venue d’Obama

[ndlr] La venue de Barack Obama en visite officielle du 23 au 25 mai 2016 suscite de nombreux espoirs au Viêt-Nam. Le mouvement pro-démocratique tentera de faire entendre sa voix.

“Sommes-nous libres, sommes-nous vraiment libres?”: samedi, quelques dissidents, ont défié le pouvoir vietnamien en organisant à Hanoi un concert secret. Un acte de résistance dans l’espoir de faire pression avant la venue de Barack Obama dans ce pays communiste.

Sur scène, dans une petite maison de la capitale vietnamienne, où le président américain arrive lundi matin: Mai Khoi, pop star et militante prodémocratie.

La question, posée à la fin d’une ballade aux accents de blues, est une interrogation rhétorique au Vietnam, pays à parti unique, qui continue à réprimer toute manifestation, à opprimer les opposants et où les syndicats sont interdits.

Lire la suite : La Voix du Nord, 22/05/2016.

Image “à la une” : la chanteuse et activiste prodémocrate Mai Khôi © DR