Archives par mot-clé : Viêt-Nam

Buddhist Literacy in Early Modern Northern Vietnam – 23–24 September 2016

[ndlr] Annonce d’un colloque sur les textes bouddhistes de l’ancien Viêt-Nam.

BUDDHIST LITERACY IN EARLY MODERN NORTHERN VIETNAM

Presented by Rutgers: The State University of New Jersey & The Vietnamese Nôm Preservation Foundation

23 September – 24 September, 2016

Recent work from a number of quarters has scrutinized the notion of “East Asia,” as a cosmopolitan zone unified by shared script, literary language, and educational traditions. Vietnam’s inclusion in modern mappings of “Southeast Asia” has often obscured its critical membership in an East Asian cultural zone, a fact that has limited potentially fruitful comparative work with Korea, China, and Japan. One of the most important features of East Asian cultural construction was the role of Buddhism in the dissemination of script, cosmopolitan language, and literate knowledge — a phenomenon particularly important to second millennium Korea, Japan, and Vietnam, each of which suffered crises in literacy at different points, due to invasion or internecine war. While comparison of Buddhist literacy in Korea and Japan has enjoyed a relatively robust tradition (especially with recent work on shared glossing techniques such as kunten), comparison with Vietnam has been limited by areal and disciplinary boundaries that are more artifacts of academic history, than substantive contours defining the cultures in question.

Our symposium seeks to break down these artifical barriers by examining a set of religious texts now housed at Thắng Nghiêm and Phổ Nhân, two syncretic Buddhist temples located 15 km southwest of Hanoi, in northern Vietnam. The collection was gathered from the surrounding region by the current abbot beginning in 1997, and represents a diverse library of primarily secular xylographic and epigraphic texts, composed over the latter half of the 2nd millennium, and written in both Literary Chinese and vernacular Vietnamese “ Chữ Nôm” (an extinct character script used to represent vernacular Vietnamese, until its replacement by the Latin alphabet in the early 20th century). As one contributor points out, these texts are remarkable for their pedestrian character, providing a uniquely mundane portrait of literacy in early modern northern Vietnam. These texts were recently digitized through the groundbreaking efforts of the Vietnamese Nom Preservation Foundation (VNPF), making the entire collection accessible to scholarly examination for the first time.

Catalyzed by the VNPF’s work, our project seeks to break new ground by staging a multidisciplinary investigation into the phenomenon of literacy, and its dissemination through the Buddhist institution. The enclosed abstracts seek to explore the nature of print culture as maintained and conducted by early modern Buddhist temples, its relationship to the court, and its philological practices and traditions, as well as its relationship to folk and non-literate traditions of religious practice. Additionally, our symposium includes a special panel on issues of digitizing the Buddhist canon — work that is foundational to all cutting edge research into premodern East Asian textual culture. These inquiries illuminate not only a sorely understudied aspect of Vietnamese history and culture, but also promise fruitful comparison with Japan, Korea, and China, on issues of Buddhism and literacy, classical education, and the rise of the vernacular.

Télécharger le programme (résumés) :

Proclamation of all involved nationalist parties [on South China Sea]

[ndlr] Proclamation des partis nationalistes Viet Nam Quoc Dan Dang, Dai Viet Quoc Dan Dang et Dan Xa au sujet de la décision de la Cour permanente d’arbitrage de La Haye dans le conflit maritime qui opposent les Philippines à la Chine.

PROCLAMATION

OF ALL INVOLVED NATIONALIST PARTIES, ORGANIZATIONS, POLITICAL ACTIVISTS, AND FELLOW VIETNAMESE,
In support of the July 12, 2016 ruling of the United Nations Arbitral Tribunal in favor of the Philippines against China’s illegal claim of the South China Sea

 Our grievances against China include:

1. From the Chinese dynasties of the past to the Communist state of China today, China have persistently attempted to invade, harass, and occupy the surrounding countries of Asia.

2. Communist authorities in Beijing have drawn arbitrary maps that show an unjustified and illegal “nine-dotted line” claim over 85% of the South China Sea as their own. China built military facilities on numerous strategic points throughout the South China Sea, including, but not limited to, the Spratley and Paracel Islands of Vietnam and the Scarborough Reef of the Philippines. Furthermore, they have occupied the waters of Brunei, Indonesia, Malaysia.

3. The Southeast Asian countries have protested and condemned the brazen and despicable invasions of China. In particular, an arbitration case was brought by the Republic of the Philippines under the arbitration provisions of the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea (UNCLOS) against the People’s Republic of China. On July 12, 2016, an arbitral tribunal under the UNCLOS ruled that the aforementioned maps have no legal basis.

4. Despite the ruling of the Tribunal, and supports of the world countries, China completely disregards the decision; and obstinately continues its provocations and invasions into other parts of the South China Sea.

5. In addition to these appalling actions, China has also dammed the Mekong River watershed, causing widespread and oftentimes disastrous water shortages that destroy the environment and ecosystem of Vietnam, Cambodia, and Laos.

Based on these grievances, We, the United Citizens, Expatriates, and Nationalist Political Forces of Vietnam, unanimously declare that:

1. We fully support and endorse the ruling of the Arbitral Tribunal on the law of the South China Sea.

2. We warmly praise the government and the peoples of the Philippines in their valiant struggle to protect the integrity of their territory in the midst of a brutal and unprecedented invasion of China. This is a legitimate, wise, and brave decision that we hope will set a model for more Southeast Asian countries to follow.

3. We condemn China for illegally invading and claiming the South China Sea which belongs to Southeast Asia. We demand Chinese government to obey the ruling of the Tribunal; and to immediately cease and desist the damming of the Mekong River watershed and release of toxins into the South China Sea.

4. We denounce and vilify the spineless and cowardly Vietnamese Communist Party leaders for always bending and submissive to the will of Beijing. The Vietnamese government neither dared to institute legal proceedings against Communist China nor named China in several killings of Vietnamese fishermen in the disputed waters. They did not even blame China for the release of toxic chemicals into the waters and land of Vietnam. Instead, the Vietnamese Communist Party actively suppresses and imprisons its own citizens who speak out against China.

5. We urgently call upon the international community to pressure China into respecting the decision of the Tribunal, and to denounce and stop China’s invasion which is indicated by its breach of peace, cause of disputes, and start of war in the South China and East Asian Seas.

6. We earnestly call for all fellow Vietnamese living in Vietnam and all Vietnamese expatriates abroad to unite as one faction in order to eradicate the Vietnamese Communist cowards and to build a liberal political institution of freedom and democracy. From this, we the people can create a just and representative internal power based on nationalism to protect our fatherland. 

Effective on the 25rd of July, 2016

Signing in the order of time:  

NOTE: The above Proclamation is posted on the following websites. There are no time limits in signing the Proclamation.

Please email Baovebiendong2016@gmail.com to add your support to this Proclamation.

http://www.vietquoc.org
http://www.daivietquocdandang.net/

★ ★ ★

 

TUYÊN CÁO

CỦA CÁC CHÍNH ĐẢNG, TỔ CHỨC, HỘI ĐOÀN,

NHÂN SĨ VÀ ĐỒNG BÀO

ỦNG HỘ PHÁN QUYẾT BIỂN ĐÔNG

CỦA TÒA TRỌNG TÀI QUỐC TẾ NGÀY 12-7-2016

 

Nhận định rằng:

  • Qua các triều đại lịch sử của Trung Hoa và Trung Cộng hiện nay, chủ trương bá quyền xâm lược, cưỡng chiếm và hủy diệt các lân quốc là nhất quán và bất biến.
  • Nhà cầm quyền Cộng Sản Bắc Kinh đã tự vẽ bản đồ chín đoạn (tức hình lưỡi bò), chiếm 85% diện tích Biển Đông, xây dựng các cơ sở quân sự trên Hoàng Sa và Trường Sa của Việt Nam, tại bãi đá Scraborough của Phi Luật Tân và lấn chiếm các vùng biển của Brunei, Indonesia, Mã Lai…
  • Các quốc gia liên hệ trong vùng đã phản đối và lên án sự xâm chiếm ngang ngược này của Trung Cộng, đặc biệt, chính phủ Phi Luật Tân đã kiện Trung Cộng ra Tòa Án Trọng tài Thường Trực La Haye. Ngày 12 tháng 7 năm 2016, Tòa đã ra phán quyết bác bỏ chủ quyền lịch sử của Trung Cộng ở khu vực thuộc hình lưỡi bò nói trên là không có cơ sở pháp lý.
  • Bất chấp sự phán quyết của Tòa Án Quốc tế và sự tán đồng của hầu hết các quốc gia Âu châu, Mỹ Châu, Úc châu, Á châu…, Trung Cộng một mặt hoàn toàn phủ nhận phán quyết này, mặt khác ngoan cố tiếp tục có những hành động khiêu khích và xâm chiếm các phần khác trong khu vực.
  • Ngoài ra, Trung Cộng còn ngăn chận nước đầu nguồn của sông Mekong gây thảm nạn thiếu nước và hủy diệt môi sinh của các quốc gia Việt Nam, Cao Miên và Ai Lao.

Trước hành động ngang ngược, bất chấp đạo lý và luật pháp quốc tế của Trung Cộng, chúng tôi, các Chính Đảng, Tôn Giáo, Cộng Đồng, Hội Đoàn, Nhân sĩ và Đồng bào trong và ngoài nước ký tên dưới đây đồng thanh tuyên bố:

  1. Hoàn toàn tán đồng và ủng hộ phán quyết của Tòa Án Trọng Tài Thường Trực ngày 12-7-2016.
  2. Nhiệt liệt ca ngợi chính phủ và nhân dân Phi Luật Tân đã cương quyết đấu tranh bảo vệ sự vẹn toàn lãnh thổ của mình trước sự xâm lăng thô bạo của Trung Cộng, đã kiện Trung Cộng ra Tòa Án Trọng Tài Thường Trực. Đây là hành động chính đáng, khôn ngoan và dũng cảm, tạo một khuôn mẫu tiền lệ cho những quốc gia đang có tranh chấp về biển đảo là phải tuân thủ và áp dụng Công ước Liên Hiệp Quốc về Luật Biển (UNLOS) 1982.
  3. Cực lực lên án Trung Cộng đã và đang xâm chiếm bất hợp pháp Biển Đông. Đòi Trung Cộng phải tuân thủ phán quyết của Tòa Án Trọng Tài Thường Trực La Haye nói trên. Mặt khác, Trung Cộng hãy chấm dứt ngay mọi hành động chận nước đầu nguồn sông Mekong và ngưng xả thải chất độc trên đất và biển Việt Nam.
  4. Nghiêm khắc lên án Tập đoàn Cộng Sản Việt Nam luôn luôn thần phục Bắc Kinh, không dám kiện Trung Cộng ra Toà Án Trọng tài Quốc Tế, thậm chí còn không dám nêu tên Trung Cộng trước những hành động giết hại ngư dân hoặc thải chất độc hủy diệt môi trường tại Việt Nam, đàn áp những người yêu nước biểu tình chống xâm lược Bắc Kinh.
  5. Khẩn kêu gọi cộng đồng quốc tế buộc Trung Cộng phải tôn trọng pháp quyết của Tòa Trọng tài Quốc Tế, lên án và ngăn chận Trung Cộng xâm lăng, phá hoại hòa bình, gây tranh chấp và khởi động chiến tranh trên Biển Đông cũng như biển Hoa Đông.
  6. Thiết tha kêu gọi toàn thể quốc dân Việt Nam trong và ngoài nước đoàn kết đấu tranh giải thể chế độ độc tài Cộng Sản Việt Nam, xây dựng một thể chế chính trị tự do dân chủ, từ đó tạo nôi lực và sức mạnh dân tộc để bảo vệ Giang sơn Tổ quốc.

Ngày 23 tháng 7 năm 2016

Ký theo thứ tự thời gian:

  • Việt Nam Quốc Dân Đảng: Lê Thành Nhân-Chủ Tịch Hội Đồng Chấp Hành Trung Ương VNQDĐ.
  • Đại Việt Quốc Dân Đảng: Trần Trọng Đạt-Chủ Tịch Đại Việt Quốc Dân Đảng
  • Việt Nam Dân Chủ Xã Hội Đảng (Dân Xã Đảng): Lê Hồng Thanh – Tổng Bí Thư Dân Xã Đảng.

GHI CHÚ: Bản tuyên cáo này sẽ được đăng trên trang mạng lưới toàn cầu để toàn dân có thể cùng ký tên không giới hạn thời gian.

Email liên lạc: Baovebiendong2016@gmail.com

Trang mạng lưới toàn cầu:

http://www.vietquoc.org
http://www.daivietquocdandang.net/

 

Esther Horat : Market Transformation and Trade Dynamics in a Peri-urban Village. Reflections from a Vietnamese Marketplace [PhD.]

[ndlr] Annonce de la thèse d’Esther Horat soutenue en mars 2016 à l’Université de Zurich. Nous reproduisons ci-dessous le message de l’anthropologue Kirsten Endres posté sur VSG avec son aimable autorisation.

In March this year, Esther Horat successfully defended her doctoral dissertation entitled “Market Transformation and Trade Dynamics in a Peri-urban Village. Reflections from a Vietnamese Marketplace.” Esther was a PhD candidate at the Max Planck Institute for Social Anthropology from 2011-2015. She defended her thesis at the University of Zurich, Switzerland, and was awarded a “magna cum laude” (with great praise) by the committee consisting of Peter Finke, Annuska Derks (both University of Zurich), and myself.

Abstract:

Based on twelve months of ethnographic research in the Vietnamese village of Ninh Hiệp, this dissertation offers an account of the various factors that have enabled it to transform into a regional trading hub for clothing and to maintain this position until the present day. The work pays great attention to how traders experience, negotiate, and react to state policies concerning the redevelopment of markets, and, in doing so, how they actively shape the political economy of Vietnam. New modes of governance – consisting of the ambivalent use of socialist and neoliberal ideologies and practices – are a crucial aspect of the study.

This research was conducted against the backdrop of decades of economic reforms initiated in socialist Vietnam in the late 1980s. Ninh Hiệp, a village along the Red River Delta, serves as a site for understanding some of the major structural changes in the region’s formal and informal labor markets and their impact on the lives of traders. In exploring some of the strategies traders employ to cope with the uncertainties of the post-reform period, the dissertation places particular emphasis on the productive side of uncertainties. Not only do traders adapt resourcefully to global capitalist formations and thereby shape the local economy, but they also deepen their social relations when confronted with uncertainties. The dissertation demonstrates how social networks among traders, as well as trust-based relations that shape informal banking and credit systems, are crucial for the functioning of the market. In addition to allowing for transactions without – or at least scarce – capital, social networks ensure the circulation of valuable information and provide access to producers and markets.

Looking closely at the operation and complexities of family businesses, the thesis discusses the dynamics involved in shaping relations and expectations across the gender and generational divide. Rather than analyzing family businesses in terms of efficiency, exploitation, or as an economic strategy of last resort, this dissertation argues in favor of their conception as agents of social change. Finally, this dissertation argues that the notion of morality is central to the lives of traders on three levels: (a) as a strategy for negotiating the boundaries of a moral community, (b) as a government tactic to project a legitimate image of itself and its policies, and (c) serving as an existential function in the face of ambiguities triggered by the socialist and neoliberal economic orders.

Many congratulations to Esther Horat!

Kirsten Endres

Ben Valentine : Photographing the Forgotten Vietnamese Widows of Japanese WWII Soldiers

[ndlr] Signalement d’un article intéressant sur une exposition photographique de Phan Quang à Ho Chi Minh-Ville.

When we talk about Japan and Vietnam in the 1940s, we discuss World War II, invasions, colonialism, and other monumental events that unfolded in this part of the world, but sent ripples across the globe. These grand historical narratives are crude tools used to summarize — but that never fully explain — what happened. In Vietnam, as in most countries, the way we remember such histories is embedded with propaganda. The stories we don’t tell, the names we forget, the people we don’t eulogize are greater in number by far than the ones we do. Vietnamese conceptual artist Phan Quang’s new series on view at Ho Chi Minh City’s Blanc Art Space, Re/Cover, is an evocative micro-history lost to most textbooks, but important nonetheless.

In 2011, Phan began researching Vietnamese women who had children with Japanese soldiers between 1940 and 1955. Although Japan was defeated and officially left Vietnam in 1945, some soldiers stayed behind until 1954–55, when their government demanded their return. Within that short window of time, when the whole world was at war and then struggling to rebuild, some Vietnamese women and Japanese soldiers fell in love and had children. While Vietnamese history decries and demonizes the invasion, and would try to ostracize these children as the products of prostitution or rapes by invaders, Phan began to find very different stories, many of them touching stories of love and remembrance, stories that did not fit into the dominant narrative.

Lire la suite : Hyperallergic, 19/07/2016.

Phan Quang’s Re/Cover is on view at Blanc Art Gallery (57 D Tu Xuong Street, District 3, Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam) through July 20.

Image “à la une” : Phan Quang, “Re/Cover no. 5” (2013) © Phan Quang

Caroline Herbelin : Architectures du Vietnam colonial. Repenser le métissage

[ndlr] Parution de l’ouvrage issu de la thèse de Caroline Herbelin. Présentation de l’éditeur.

Herbelin_ArchitecturesVietnamColonial_RepenserLeMétissageL’architecture a très peu été étudiée dans l’Indochine française, contrairement au Maroc, l’Algérie ou l’Égypte de l’époque coloniale. Architectures du Vietnam colonial comble amplement cette lacune. Mais ce livre est aussi un ouvrage décisif sur l’histoire politique et sociale des échanges culturels au sein de cette colonie française. Il en renouvelle en profondeur les perspectives tant par son approche méthodologique que par sa réflexion théorique sur le concept d’hybridation, sur le moment colonial. Il est appelé à faire date dans les études coloniales en France.

L’originalité de cet ouvrage provient de ce que Caroline Herbelin a fondé son étude sur une enquête de terrain vaste et approfondie. À commencer bien sûr par une consultation des archives, françaises comme vietnamiennes. L’auteur a ainsi pu reconstituer les discussions qui ont présidé à la création d’une section Architecture dans l’École des beaux-arts de l’Indochine créée par Victor Tardieu, concernant le choix des matériaux de construction, « indigènes » (bambou, bois, paillote, torchis) ou métropolitains en dur (fer, béton, tuiles, briques), etc. L’auteur a également suivi les cheminements des techniques entre la métropole et la colonie jusque dans leur perception et formulation, pour identifier les interactions des deux systèmes techniques mis en présence. Pour finir, elle a interrogé la mémoire des vivants, témoins contemporains des survivances et des suites de l’époque coloniale.

Ce matériau riche et divers que Caroline Herbelin rassemble en lui restituant toute sa vie, lui a, en retour, permis d’opérer un déplacement décisif dans la définition de son objet d’étude, l’architecture. Celle-ci n’est plus abordée du seul point des bâtiments effectivement construits, ou de leur portée esthétique, mais aussi comme un objet d’art au sens étymologique d’ars, c’est-à-dire comme ce qui est fabriqué par les hommes et s’inscrit dans un jeu de relations économiques, politiques et sociales et est doté d’une « vie sociale ». L’approche se doit dès lors d’être concrète, matérielle et pratique : il s’agit de comprendre comment la construction d’un bâtiment a résulté de négociations et de stratégies entre les différentes instances et relais des pouvoirs colonial et local, entre les populations « indigène » et française, mais aussi entre les différentes solutions techniques et esthétiques qui se sont offertes à ce moment-là.

Une histoire, des histoires se racontent à travers cette enquête et qui ne sont pas celles que l’on attend. Caroline Herbelin ne fait pas le récit d’une architecture qui serait nécessairement l’instrument d’une domination unilatérale, a fortiori en contexte colonial ; elle ne retrace pas l’aventure d’une architecture triomphante où Saigon ferait figure de la « perle française de l’Extrême-Orient » et Hanoi est comparée à Paris ; elle ne se limite pas non plus à l’histoire politique énoncée par les pouvoirs, celle d’une politique dite d’« association », prônée par Albert Sarraut dès le début des années 1910, qui devient au fil du temps « politique de collaboration », ni à une histoire événementielle. Ce qu’elle décrit, par exemple, derrière des pratiques dites de « zoning » (découpage du territoire en zones fonctionnelles différenciées), derrière des pratiques de ségrégation souvent contrecarrées en raison de nécessités matérielles, c’est l’apparition d’une autre ville entre les plans, où des Français habitent des maisons « vietnamiennes » et inversement. Ce sont les tentatives de la fondation d’un style « indochinois » prônée par l’architecte français Ernest Hébrard, puis l’apparition des premiers architectes vietnamiens formés à l’École des beaux-arts d’Indochine avec le soutien de Victor Tardieu et l’ouverture du premier cabinet franco-vietnamien.

Ces récits démontrent, notamment à propos du style néoclassique ou de la récente apparition d’un « nouveau style français », l’existence de circulations interasiatiques tout aussi décisives que des transferts d’ouest en est. Ce qu’elle révèle donc, c’est qu’il n’y a pas une architecture coloniale à proprement parler, mais des phénomènes de métissage qui s’inscrivent dans un rapport complexe de différentes historicités enchâssées, de différentes cultures entrecroisées, et dans lequel vient s’inscrire le moment colonial. L’image qu’elle a choisie en couverture de son ouvrage révèle une somptueuse maison Art Déco construite dans la campagne du Vietnam du Sud par un maître d’œuvre vietnamien: les échanges culturels sont bien loin de s’être limités à l’architecture savante, citadine, ils ont aussi gagné l’architecture populaire des campagnes…

Jeune chercheuse spécialiste de l’Asie, des échanges culturels et de l’histoire urbaine au Vietnam, Caroline Herbelin est maître de conférences et enseigne à l’université de Toulouse-Jean-Jaurès. Elle est membre associée au Centre de Recherches sur l’Extrême Orient de Paris – Sorbonne (CREOPS), au laboratoire de recherche France Amériques Espagne. Sociétés, Pouvoirs, Acteurs (FRAMESPA) et Présidente de l’Association française pour la recherche sur l’Asie du Sud-Est (AFRASE). Elle a été conseillère de l’exposition « Indochine, des territoires et des hommes, 1856-1956 », dont elle a coédité le catalogue, publié chez Gallimard en 2013.

Réf. : Herbelin, Caroline, Architectures du Vietnam colonial. Repenser le métissage, Paris, INHA / CTHS, 2016, 367 pages, 80 illustrations noirs et blanc – 33 € – ISBN : 978-2-7355-0846-4

Source : INHA (Institut national d’histoire de l’Art)

Le Huu Khoa : Anthropologie du Vietnam – Vol. 5. L’espace cognitif du peuple

[ndlr] Parution du 5e volume de la série Anthropologie du Vietnam du Professeur Le Huu Khoa. Présentation de l’éditeur.

LeHuuKhoa_Anthropologie_5L’auteur explore dans ce volume les rouages du Parti communiste vietnamien. Reconnu par la population comme un acteur capital et positif de la lutte pour l’indépendance, il est aujourd’hui critiqué pour toutes ses dérives autoritaires, voire mafieuses.

Le fonctionnement clanique actuel aboutit à un affaiblissement considérable des valeurs, mais aussi des qualités intellectuelles et de l’aptitude à gouverner des dirigeants. Les liens familiaux, d’intérêts, la corruption, ont dévalorisé non seulement le pouvoir, mais encore des secteurs essentiels pour l’avenir du pays comme l’Éducation, la Recherche, entre autres.

Les limites et les déchirements internes du Parti communiste vietnamien se vérifient tragiquement dans l’attitude des dirigeants vis-à-vis de la Chine, voisin surpuissant qui prend une place grandissante dans le contrôle économique du pays, et qui annexe peu à peu des îles et des archipels du Pacifique appartenant au Vietnam. La politique du Parti est un facteur de rupture croissante entre les dirigeants et le peuple.

Source : Les Indes savantes

Autres volumes parus aux Indes savantes :
Anthropologie du Vietnam. Vol. 1 – L’espace mental du lien (2009)
Anthropologie du Vietnam. Vol. 2 – L’espace spirituel de la vie (2009)
Anthropologie du Vietnam. Vol. 3 – L’espace réflexif de l’homme (2011)
Anthropologie du Vietnam. Vol. 4 – L’espace singulier du destin (2014)

Christopher Goscha: “Towards a History of Modern Vietnam” [Cornell University]

[ndlr] Excellente conférence de notre collègue Christopher Goscha à l’occasion de la présentation de son nouvel ouvrage sur le Viêt-Nam. Une nouvelle histoire pour comprendre la pluralité du Viêt-Nam d’aujourd’hui et comment ce pays s’est construit culturellement, géographiquement, humainement.

Cornell Voices on Vietnam Spring 2016 Speakers’ Series presents  Professor Christopher Goscha (Professor of History at Université du Québec à Montréal) – “Towards a History of Modern Vietnam.” Recorded May 5, 2016.

This event is co-sponsored by Southeast Asia Program, the Department of Asian Studies, the Department of History and the Department of Government.

Acclaimed historian and Vietnam specialist Christopher Goscha discusses his latest work, The Penguin History of Modern Vietnam (2016). Popular impressions of Vietnam are still largely dominated by the Vietnam War, with most English-language accounts focused on American experiences, sources, and perspectives. But Vietnam’s history is much richer and more complex than a mere Cold War confrontation, complete with expansion, schisms, colonial conquest and subjugation, cultural renaissance, and revolution.

Drawing on research and discoveries from a host of Vietnamese-language and global sources, Professor Goscha outlines a rich and compelling overview of modern Vietnamese history, portraying a cast of memorable characters – from Emperors to rebels, poets to priests – and providing a fascinating look at the intricacies and complexities of modern Vietnamese history. Compelling for scholars and non-specialists alike, The Penguin History of Modern Vietnam represents the first English-language general history of contemporary Vietnam.

Source : Voices On Vietnam