Archives par mot-clé : société

Tủ sách Tiếng Việt [ressources en ligne]

[ndlr] Signalement d’un site fondé en 2017 compilant des copies numérisées d’ouvrages en vietnamien publiés avant 1975. Le portail localisé à Little Saigon en Californie n’offre pas d’informations sur le projet. Près de deux millions de visiteurs à ce jour (10/07/2017) et un peu plus de 350 documents en ligne. A suivre.

Cliquer sur l’image pour accéder au site

Changing Lives in Laos: Society, Politics, and Culture in a Post-Socialist State [parution]

[ndlr] Parution d’une nouvelle publication sur le Laos contemporain sous la direction de Vatthana Pholsena et Vanina Bouté. Présentation de l’éditeur.

Changing Lives in Laos:

Society, Politics, and Culture in a Post-Socialist State

Edited by Vanina Bouté and Vatthana Pholsena

Changes in the character of the political regime in Laos after 2000, a massive influx of foreign investment, and disruptions to rural life arising from improved communications and new forms of mobility within and across the borders have produced a major transformation across the country. Witnessing these changes, a group of scholars carried out studies that document the rise of a new social, cultural and economic order. The contributions to this volume draw on original fieldwork materials and unpublished sources, and provide fresh analyses of topics ranging from the structures of power to the politics of territoriality and new forms of sociability in emerging urban spaces.

“In Changing Lives in Laos, Vanina Bouté and Vatthana Pholsena have assembled an invaluable collection of papers on Laos by key established and emerging scholars of the country. While Laos remains under-studied compared to most of the region, these chapters show an increasingly thorough engagement with people and places and a better understanding of the texture of transition and transformation.”
Jonathan Rigg, Department of Geography, National University of Singapore

“This new book on Laos, edited by two leading specialists on this country, features articles by a new generation of historians, anthropologists, geographers and political scientists. Studying state formation, new economic trends, and issues such as the cultural integration of ethnic minorities and rural migration, this interesting book brilliantly demonstrates how in less than fifty years Lao society has been deeply transformed.”
Yves Goudineau, Director of the French School of Asian Studies (EFEO), Chair in Comparative Anthropology of Southeast Asia (Paris)

________________________________________________________ 

CONTENTS
List of Illustrations
1. Introduction
Vanina Bouté and Vatthana Pholsena

PART I: STATE FORMATION AND POLITICAL LEGITIMATION
2. The History and Evolution of the Lao People’s Revolutionary Party
Martin Rathie
3. Shaping the National Topography: The Party-State, National Imageries, and Questions of Political Authority in Lao PDR
Oliver Tappe
4. ‘Special Operation Pagoda’: Buddhism, Covert Operations, and the Politics of Religious Subversion in Cold-War Laos (1957-60)
Patrice Ladwig
5. War Generation: Youth Mobilization and Socialization in Revolutionary Laos
Vatthana Pholsena
6. Socialist Pathways of Education: The Lao in East Germany
Nicole Reichert

PART II: NATURAL RESOURCE GOVERNANCE AND AGRARIAN CHANGE
7. The Poltical Ecology of Upland/Lowland Relationships in Laos since 1975
Olivier Évrard and Ian G. Baird
8. The New ‘New Battlefield’: Capitalizing Security in Laos’ Agribusiness Landscape
Michael B. Dwyer
9. Reaching the Cities: New Forms of Network and Social Differentiation in Northern Laos
Vanina Bouté

PART III: ETHNIC MINORITIES ENGAGING WITH MODERNITY
10. Ethnic Belonging in Laos: A Politico-Historical Perspective
Grégoire Schlemmer
11. Piglets Are Buffaloes: Buddhification and the Reduction of Sacrifices on the Boloven Plateau
Guido Sprenger
12. Rubber’s Affective Economies: Seeding a Social Landscape in Northwest Laos
Chris Lyttleton and Yunxia Li

PART IV: IN SEARCH OF OPPORTUNITIES: MOVING ACROSS AND OUTSIDE THE COUNTRY
13. Migration and Mobility in Laos
Sverre Molland
14. Patterns and Consequences of Undocumented Migration from Lao PDR to Thailand
Kabmanivanh Phouxay
15. Textiles Economy in Laos: From the Household to the World
Annabel Vallard

Bibliography
Contributors
Index

Source : NUS Press

Vietnam-Indochina-Japan Relations during the Second World War [parution]

[ndlr] Parution du deuxième volet du projet de recherche de la Japan Society for the Promotion of Science (JSPS), n° 25243007 intitulé “Comprehensive Study for New Developments in Japan-French Indochina-Vietnam Relations during the Second World War”.

Volume édité sous la direction de Masaya Shiraishi, Nguyen Van Khanh et Bruce M. Lockhart, Tokyo : Waseda University Institute of Asia-Pacific Studies (WIAPS), February 2017, 333 p.

 

Sur le premier volet de ce projet, voir : https://indomemoires.hypotheses.org/17760

 

 

Sophie Quinn-Judge : The Third Force in the Vietnam War: The Elusive Search for Peace 1954-75 [parution]

[ndlr] Avis de parution d’une nouvelle étude l’historienne Sophie Quinn-Judge. Présentation de l’éditeur.

It was the conflict that shocked America and the world, but the struggle for peace is central to the history of the Vietnam War. Rejecting the idea that war between Hanoi and the US was inevitable, the author traces North Vietnam’s programs for a peaceful reunification of their nation from the 1954 Geneva negotiations up to the final collapse of the Saigon government in 1975. She also examines the ways that groups and personalities in South Vietnam responded by crafting their own peace proposals, in the hope that the Vietnamese people could solve their disagreements by engaging in talks without outside interference. While most of the writing on peacemaking during the Vietnam War concerns high-level international diplomacy, Sophie Quinn-Judge reminds us of the courageous efforts of southern Vietnamese, including Buddhists, Catholics, students and citizens, to escape the unprecedented destruction that the US war brought to their people. The author contends that US policymakers showed little regard for the attitudes of the South Vietnamese population when they took over the war effort in 1964 and sent in their own troops to fight it in 1965.

A unique contribution of this study is the interweaving of developments in South Vietnamese politics with changes in the balance of power in Hanoi; both of the Vietnamese combatants are shown to evolve towards greater rigidity as the war progresses, while the US grows increasingly committed to President Thieu in Saigon, after the election of Richard Nixon. Not even the signing of the 1973 Paris Peace Agreement could blunt US support for Thieu and his obstruction of the peace process. The result was a difficult peace in 1975, achieved by military might rather than reconciliation, and a new realization of the limits of American foreign policy.

Sophie Quinn-Judge is the Associate Director of the Centre for Vietnamese History at Temple University. She was for many years a South East Asia correspondent for the Far Eastern Economic Review and for The Guardian. One of the foremost scholars of the Vietnam War, she taught for many years at the LSE and SOAS.

Ref. : Quinn-Judge, Sophie, The Third Force in the Vietnam War: The Elusive Search for Peace 1954-75, London, I.B.Tauris & Co Ltd, 2017, 336 p. ISBN: 9781784535971

Source : I.B.Tauris

 

Mei Feng Mok: “Negotiating Community and Nation in Chợ Lớn: Nation-building, Community-building and Transnationalism in Everyday Life during the Republic of Việt Nam, 1955-1975”

[ndlr] Présentation par Christoph Giebel de la thèse de Mei Feng Mok sur Cholon et sa population sous la République du Viêt-Nam de 1955 à 1975. Chronique publiée avec l’autorisation de son auteur.

Ref.: Mei Feng Mok, Negotiating Community and Nation in Chợ Lớn: Nation-building, Community-building and Transnationalism in Everyday Life during the Republic of Việt Nam, 1955-1975, University of Washington, History, PhD thesis, Chair: Christoph Giebel, 2016.

It is with great pleasure that I announce to VSG a newly minted Ph.D.

On 8 June 2016, at the History department of the University of Washington, Seattle (USA), Mei Feng Mok successfully defended her dissertation “Negotiating Community and Nation in Chợ Lớn: Nation-building, Community-building and Transnationalism in Everyday Life during the Republic of Việt Nam, 1955-1975.”  The dissertation is based on a variety of sources in Vietnamese, Chinese, French and English, most notably rare and rarely-used Chinese-language newspapers from Chợ Lớn.  Examiners were Laurie Sears, Sasha Welland, and Christoph Giebel (chair);  Moon-ho Jung and Madeleine Dong added guidance at earlier stages of research.  Before coming to UW, Mei Feng Mok earned an MA in History at the National University of Singapore (NUS) with Bruce Lockhart.

Focusing on social life ordered around markets, native place congregations and temples, schools and work places, hospitals and medicinal halls, sports clubs and restaurants, private homes and public leisure places, Mei Feng deftly provides a rich tapestry of Chợ Lớn’s Chinese community, particularly its middle class, and the changes it underwent over time.  She situates Chợ Lớn in multiple relations: as one center of greater Sài Gòn, economic conduit for the southern Vietnamese hinterlands, socio-cultural hub for Chinese communities throughout Indochina, nodal point in transnational Chinese exchanges linking San Francisco, Hong Kong, China, and Singapore, and contributor to Cold War-era and Taiwan/ROC-centric sinophonic articulations.

The dissertation is organized into four main chapters:  

  • 1) Chợ Lớn’s built environment and human geography, its lived and shared spaces;  
  • 2) Education from kindergarten to adult learning between local and transnational networks and the state;  
  • 3) Sports and competitions over disciplining bodies and controlling social time;  
  • and 4) young adulthood, women in the public sphere, and socialization into multi-layered networks through marriage, work, philanthropy, and other ways of accumulating and spending social capital. 

Here Chợ Lớn emerges as a site of contestation between diasporic community interests, a “nation-building” Vietnamese state, and the transnational Chinese world not easily negotiated by individuals and further complicated by war, violence, and ideological divisions.

 Mei Feng’s work is bound to make significant contributions to a variety of fields:  e.g., to social history (and here everyday urban life) of which Việt Nam Studies are still desperately starved, to the growing body of studies on the Republic of Việt Nam (and a rare one where the RVN simply “is” rather than “fails”), to conversations about diasporic/minority communities with multiple identities in Việt Nam (and elsewhere), and to our knowledge of overseas Chinese and the dynamic currents in the Cold War-era transnational Chinese world.  Mei Feng will now take her talents and work to a Post-doctoral Fellowship position at the Asia Research Institute (ARI) in Singapore (NUS) where this important and exciting dissertation may well turn into a marvelous book.

 
Congratulations to Dr. Mei Feng Mok!
 
C. Giebel

UW-Seattle

Source : VSG

Image “à la une” : Le marché de Binh Tây à Cholon en 1960.

Nguyễn Quang Lập : Sài Gòn giải phóng tôi – Saigon m’a libéré

[ndlr] A lire sur la page Facebook de l’écrivain Nguyễn Quang Lập sa découverte de Saigon, un anniversaire fondateur.

Mãi tới ngày 30 tháng 4 năm 1975 tôi mới biết thế nào là ngày sinh nhật. Quê tôi người ta chỉ quan tâm tới ngày chết, ngày sinh nhật là cái gì rất phù phiếm. Ngày sinh của tôi ngủ yên trong học bạ, chỉ được nhắc đến mỗi kì chuyển cấp. Từ thuở bé con đến năm 19 tuổi chẳng có ai nhắc tôi ngày sinh nhật, tôi cũng chẳng quan tâm. Đúng ngày “non sông thu về một mối” tôi đang học Bách Khoa Hà Nội, cô giáo dạy toán xác suất đã cho hay đó cũng là ngày sinh nhật của tôi. Thật không ngờ. Tôi vui mừng đến độ muốn bay vào Sài Gòn ngay lập tức, để cùng Sài Gòn tận hưởng “Ngày trọng đại”.

Lire la suite : Facebook (29/04/2016)