Archives par mot-clé : jeunesse

Mei Feng Mok: « Negotiating Community and Nation in Chợ Lớn: Nation-building, Community-building and Transnationalism in Everyday Life during the Republic of Việt Nam, 1955-1975 »

[ndlr] Présentation par Christoph Giebel de la thèse de Mei Feng Mok sur Cholon et sa population sous la République du Viêt-Nam de 1955 à 1975. Chronique publiée avec l’autorisation de son auteur.

Ref.: Mei Feng Mok, Negotiating Community and Nation in Chợ Lớn: Nation-building, Community-building and Transnationalism in Everyday Life during the Republic of Việt Nam, 1955-1975, University of Washington, History, PhD thesis, Chair: Christoph Giebel, 2016.

It is with great pleasure that I announce to VSG a newly minted Ph.D.

On 8 June 2016, at the History department of the University of Washington, Seattle (USA), Mei Feng Mok successfully defended her dissertation « Negotiating Community and Nation in Chợ Lớn: Nation-building, Community-building and Transnationalism in Everyday Life during the Republic of Việt Nam, 1955-1975. »  The dissertation is based on a variety of sources in Vietnamese, Chinese, French and English, most notably rare and rarely-used Chinese-language newspapers from Chợ Lớn.  Examiners were Laurie Sears, Sasha Welland, and Christoph Giebel (chair);  Moon-ho Jung and Madeleine Dong added guidance at earlier stages of research.  Before coming to UW, Mei Feng Mok earned an MA in History at the National University of Singapore (NUS) with Bruce Lockhart.

Focusing on social life ordered around markets, native place congregations and temples, schools and work places, hospitals and medicinal halls, sports clubs and restaurants, private homes and public leisure places, Mei Feng deftly provides a rich tapestry of Chợ Lớn’s Chinese community, particularly its middle class, and the changes it underwent over time.  She situates Chợ Lớn in multiple relations: as one center of greater Sài Gòn, economic conduit for the southern Vietnamese hinterlands, socio-cultural hub for Chinese communities throughout Indochina, nodal point in transnational Chinese exchanges linking San Francisco, Hong Kong, China, and Singapore, and contributor to Cold War-era and Taiwan/ROC-centric sinophonic articulations.

The dissertation is organized into four main chapters:  

  • 1) Chợ Lớn’s built environment and human geography, its lived and shared spaces;  
  • 2) Education from kindergarten to adult learning between local and transnational networks and the state;  
  • 3) Sports and competitions over disciplining bodies and controlling social time;  
  • and 4) young adulthood, women in the public sphere, and socialization into multi-layered networks through marriage, work, philanthropy, and other ways of accumulating and spending social capital. 

Here Chợ Lớn emerges as a site of contestation between diasporic community interests, a « nation-building » Vietnamese state, and the transnational Chinese world not easily negotiated by individuals and further complicated by war, violence, and ideological divisions.

 Mei Feng’s work is bound to make significant contributions to a variety of fields:  e.g., to social history (and here everyday urban life) of which Việt Nam Studies are still desperately starved, to the growing body of studies on the Republic of Việt Nam (and a rare one where the RVN simply « is » rather than « fails »), to conversations about diasporic/minority communities with multiple identities in Việt Nam (and elsewhere), and to our knowledge of overseas Chinese and the dynamic currents in the Cold War-era transnational Chinese world.  Mei Feng will now take her talents and work to a Post-doctoral Fellowship position at the Asia Research Institute (ARI) in Singapore (NUS) where this important and exciting dissertation may well turn into a marvelous book.

 
Congratulations to Dr. Mei Feng Mok!
 
C. Giebel

UW-Seattle

Source : VSG

Image « à la une » : Le marché de Binh Tây à Cholon en 1960.

Kim Huynh : Vietnam as if… Tales of youth, love and destiny

[ndlr] Parution d’un récit romancé de Kim Huynh sur les espoirs de la jeunesse vietnamienne à travers cinq portraits et destins différents. Présentation de l’éditeur.

Vietnam as if…

Tales of youth, love and destiny

Kim Huynh

Vietnam as if… follows five young people who have moved from the countryside to the city. Their dramatic everyday lives illuminate some of the most pressing issues in Vietnam today: ‘The Sticky Rice Seller’ explores gender roles; ‘The Ball Boy’ is all about the struggles of sexual and ethnic minorities; ‘The Professional’ examines relations between rich and poor; ‘The Goalkeeper’ delves into politics and ideology; and ‘The Student’ reflects upon family and faith. The stories also reboot several classics of Vietnamese literature for the twenty-first century, including ‘Floating Dumplings’ by feminist poet Ho Xuan Huong, Vu Trong Phung’s satire of French colonialism Dumb Luck, Nguyen Du’s epic account of fate and sacrifice ‘The Tale of Kieu’, and the proclamations of Ho Chi Minh. These novellas reveal the deepest sentiments of Vietnamese youth as they – like youth everywhere – come of age, fall in love and contest their destiny.

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/vietnamasif

In 2011 Kim Huynh returned to Vietnam, having left more than three decades earlier. He had few plans other than to experience as much of his birthplace as possible. That year he came into contact with a wide range of people and took on many trades. Kim drank and dined with government officials, went on pilgrimages with corporate tycoons and marched in the streets against foreign aggression. He sold sticky rice, was a tennis player and also a ball boy, attended all manner of rituals and celebrations, eavesdropped on people in cafés and restaurants, and went back to the classroom as both a student and a teacher. Rich in detail and broad in scope, these tales capture Kim’s experiences and imaginings of Vietnam as if….

ISBN 9781925022308 (Print version) $25.00 (GST inclusive)
ISBN 9781925022315 (Online)

Source : ANU Press

Image « à la une » : © Vietnam as if (Facebook).

At the Horizon « ປາຍທາງ » – Plai Tang

At the Horizon « ປາຍທາງ » the first Lao Thriller-Drama movie by the Lao New Wave Cinema Productions.
Officially screening at Lao-Itec, Vientiane, Laos on 22 Feb. 2012 ; French Institute theater, Vientiane, Laos 25 Feb. 2012.

Un cinéaste de 29 ans a mis il y a quelques mois le doigt sur des vérités qui dérangent : dans son film Plai Tang (« Sur l’horizon »), Anysay Keola évoque les questions de l’enrichissement et de la pauvreté, des liens du pouvoir et de la réussite, des enfants gâtés du parti. Un polar noir, violent, au message sans ambiguïté. « Mon film reflète la réalité d’un Laos contemporain où, franchement, il y a les gens bien placés qui ne pensent plus qu’à l’argent et ceux pour lesquels il est impossible de s’offrir les produits de luxe qui s’affichent partout », constate Anysay, chef de file de la « nouvelle vague lao ». « Au plan politique, ajoute-t-il, le système me fait penser à une sorte de monarchie » (extrait de : Bruno Philip, Le Monde, 03/11/2012).

For More Information :
www.atthehorizon-movie.com