Archives par mot-clé : guerre du Viêt Nam

Christopher Goscha : Peace matters [book review]

[ndlr] Signalement de la recension de l’ouvrage de Sophie Quinn-Judge (The Third Force in the Vietnam War: The Elusive Search for Peace, 1954-75) par Christopher E. Goscha. En accès libre pendant quelques jours sur Mekong Review. Lecture vivement conseillée.

Sophie Quinn-Judge landed in central Vietnam in 1973 as a member of the American Friends Service Committee (AFSC). She served in the AFSC-run Rehabilitation Centre in Quang Ngai province until the end of the war in 1975, providing prosthetics and relief help to war-injured civilians coming from all sides of the conflict ripping Vietnam apart. Quinn-Judge grew up in Quaker country in the suburbs of Philadelphia. Although she was not initially a member of this breakaway Protestant faith, she took part in their youth camps as a youngster and felt at home working in the AFSC in France and Vietnam.

The Quakers established the AFSC upon the United States’ entry into the First World War in 1917. The Quakers refused to take part in war as an article of faith. So instead of sending their sons into the trenches of the Western Front, the AFSC mobilised their young people to help civilians hurt and displaced by the conflagration. The AFSC did more than provide humanitarian aid, however. Drawing on centuries of Quaker pacifism, the organisation actively promoted “lasting peace with justice, as a practical expression of faith in action”. Educational programs, youth camps and exchanges helped nurture “the seeds of change and respect for human life that transform social relations and systems”. In 1947, the AFSC received the Nobel Prize for Peace for its humanitarian relief efforts during and after the Second World War and its promotion of world peace. The Quakers continued their work during the Cold War, dispatching people to work in war-torn areas of the Afro-Asian world, including Vietnam.[1]

Quinn-Judge carried these values with her to Quang Ngai, working tirelessly in the rehabilitation centre. Arriving shortly after the signing of the Paris Peace Accords, she also became an advocate of peace. The Paris Agreement, signed by the Vietnamese and US sides in January 1973, called for the creation of a coalition government in South Vietnam that would eventually replace the embattled Republic of Vietnam. The coalition would include members from this state, a host of non-communist religious, neutralist and democratic leaders, as well as the communist-backed National Liberation Front (NLF) and the People’s Revolutionary Government for the south. This southern coalition would then decide the south’s destiny via negotiations with the north.

Lire la suite : Mekong Review

Image « à la une » : With journalists from Van nghe quan doi, Quinn-Judge, far right. Photograph : Claudia Krich © Mekong Review

 

Lien-Hang Nguyen : Who Called the Shots in Hanoi?

[ndlr] Le Viêt-Nam en guerre pendant l’année 1967 : une vue de Hanoi. Signalons cet excellent article de l’historienne Lien-Hang Nguyen.

As any account of combat in the Vietnam War will tell you, America fought an “elusive enemy”: guerrillas who would strike and then disappear; battalion commanders who refused to engage in open battles. But there’s more to the cliché than most people realize. Even by 1967, America’s military, intelligence and civilian leaders had no real idea who was actually calling the shots in Hanoi.

To some extent, this is what the North wanted — the impression that decisions were made collectively, albeit under the gentle guiding hand of President Ho Chi Minh. But the American confusion also, inadvertently, reflected the messy, factionalized reality of North Vietnamese politics, one that historians are only now coming to grasp. Thanks to the slow if capricious process of historical declassification, the publications of renegade memoirs and histories, the dissemination of “open letters” by disgruntled former leaders, and the careful and painstaking research and analysis by Vietnam specialists, we now have a better understanding of who was on top in Hanoi and what battles he waged to get there.

Lire la suite / Read more : The New York Times, The Opinion Pages, 14/02/2017.

Lien-Hang Nguyen is a professor of history at Columbia and the author of the forthcoming “Tet 1968: The Battles That Changed the Vietnam War and the Global Cold War.”

Image « à la une » ; Ho Chi Minh, le président de la RDVN et Le Duan, le secrétaire général du Parti des Travailleurs du Viêt-Nam [futur PCV] à Hanoi.

Christopher Goscha : 1er septembre 1966 – Le discours de Phnom Penh

[ndlr] Article à lire sur le site de l’auteur. Christopher Goscha est Professeur agrégé au département d’histoire à l’université du Québec à Montréal (UQAM). Il a récemment publié une « nouvelle histoire du Viêt-Nam ».

En visite au Cambodge, De Gaulle défie les Américains en proclamant « le droit des peuples à disposer d’eux-mêmes ». Rendue possible par la fin de la guerre d’Algérie, cette révolution diplomatique est le fruit d’une lente maturation, qui le voit rompre avec une politique étrangère séculaire braquée sur l’empire. Mais il n’ira pas jusqu’à abandonner les possessions françaises dans le Pacifique : elles sont trop nécessaires à la dissuasion nucléaire et à l’indépendance qu’il revendique en pleine guerre froide.

Lire l’article : 1er septembre 1966 : Le Discours de Phnom Penh (PDF) in L’histoire de France vue d’ailleurs, Paris, Les Arènes, 2016, pp. 556-569.

Sophie Quinn-Judge : The Third Force in the Vietnam War: The Elusive Search for Peace 1954-75 [parution]

[ndlr] Avis de parution d’une nouvelle étude l’historienne Sophie Quinn-Judge. Présentation de l’éditeur.

It was the conflict that shocked America and the world, but the struggle for peace is central to the history of the Vietnam War. Rejecting the idea that war between Hanoi and the US was inevitable, the author traces North Vietnam’s programs for a peaceful reunification of their nation from the 1954 Geneva negotiations up to the final collapse of the Saigon government in 1975. She also examines the ways that groups and personalities in South Vietnam responded by crafting their own peace proposals, in the hope that the Vietnamese people could solve their disagreements by engaging in talks without outside interference. While most of the writing on peacemaking during the Vietnam War concerns high-level international diplomacy, Sophie Quinn-Judge reminds us of the courageous efforts of southern Vietnamese, including Buddhists, Catholics, students and citizens, to escape the unprecedented destruction that the US war brought to their people. The author contends that US policymakers showed little regard for the attitudes of the South Vietnamese population when they took over the war effort in 1964 and sent in their own troops to fight it in 1965.

A unique contribution of this study is the interweaving of developments in South Vietnamese politics with changes in the balance of power in Hanoi; both of the Vietnamese combatants are shown to evolve towards greater rigidity as the war progresses, while the US grows increasingly committed to President Thieu in Saigon, after the election of Richard Nixon. Not even the signing of the 1973 Paris Peace Agreement could blunt US support for Thieu and his obstruction of the peace process. The result was a difficult peace in 1975, achieved by military might rather than reconciliation, and a new realization of the limits of American foreign policy.

Sophie Quinn-Judge is the Associate Director of the Centre for Vietnamese History at Temple University. She was for many years a South East Asia correspondent for the Far Eastern Economic Review and for The Guardian. One of the foremost scholars of the Vietnam War, she taught for many years at the LSE and SOAS.

Ref. : Quinn-Judge, Sophie, The Third Force in the Vietnam War: The Elusive Search for Peace 1954-75, London, I.B.Tauris & Co Ltd, 2017, 336 p. ISBN: 9781784535971

Source : I.B.Tauris

 

Christopher Goscha : The 30-Years War in Vietnam

[ndlr] Signalement d’un article en ligne de notre collègue Christopher Goscha, professeur à l’UQAM. Rubrique : Vietnam ’67/// Historians, veterans and journalists recall 1967 in Vietnam, a year that changed the war and changed America.

vietnam67It should go without saying that the Vietnam War is remembered by different people in very different ways. Most Americans remember it as a war fought between 1965 and 1975 that bogged down their military in a struggle to prevent the Communists from marching into Southeast Asia, deeply dividing Americans as it did. The French remember their loss there as a decade-long conflict, fought from 1945 to 1954, when they tried to hold on to the Asian pearl of their colonial empire until losing it in a place called Dien Bien Phu.

The Vietnamese, in contrast, see the war as a national liberation struggle, or as a civil conflict, depending on which side they were on, ending in victory in 1975 for one side and tragedy for the other. For the Vietnamese, it was above all a 30-year conflict transforming direct and indirect forms of fighting into a brutal conflagration, one that would end up claiming over three million Vietnamese lives.

The point is not that one perspective is better or more accurate than the other. What’s important, rather, is to understand how the colonial war, the civil war and the Cold War intertwined to produce such a deadly conflagration by 1967.

Lire la suite : The New York Times, 07/02/2017.

Image « à la une » : Prise du PC-GONO par les soldats Vietminh de la division 316 dans la soirée du 7 mai 1954. © AFP/VNA

Tran Van Thuy and Le Thanh Dung : The Memoir of a Vietnamese Filmmaker in War and Peace [parution]

[ndlr] Traduction en anglais des mémoires du cinéaste Tran Van Thuy. Présentation de l’éditeur.

In Whose Eyes

The Memoir of a Vietnamese Filmmaker in War and Peace
A Vietnamese perspective on the Vietnam war and its legacies
tranvanthuy_inwhoseeyes

Trân Van Thuy is a celebrated Vietnamese filmmaker of more than twenty award-winning documentaries. A cameraman for the People’s Army of Vietnam during the Vietnam War, he went on to achieve international fame as the director of films that address the human costs of the war and its aftermath.

Thuy’s memoir, when published in Vietnam in 2013, immediately sold out. In this translation, English-language readers are now able to learn in rich detail about the life and work of this preeminent artist. Written in a gentle and charming style, the memoir is filled with reflections on war, peace, history, freedom of expression, and filmmaking. Thuy also offers a firsthand account of the war in Vietnam and its aftermath from a Vietnamese perspective, adding a dimension rarely encountered in English-language literature.

Source : University of Massachusetts Amherst

Thich Nhat Hanh, une vie en pleine conscience [parution]

[ndlr] Première biographie en langue française du vénérable Nhat Hanh (Thích Nhất Hạnh), actuellement âgé de 90 ans et retiré en Thaïlande. Présentation de l’éditeur.

thichnhathanh_biographieLa vie du moine Thich Nhât Hanh témoigne de la puissance de la paix. Né au Viêt Nam en 1926, il assiste à l’embrasement de son pays et aux guerres qui le ravagent. Moine à 16 ans, ce grand maître zen ne dissocie pas l’action politique et sociale de la pratique spirituelle. Mettant en valeur l’enseignement des maîtres, il s’élève pourtant contre les pesanteurs de la tradition et y apporte de profonds changements. Sa compassion dépasse toute vue partisane, son regard englobe et ne sépare jamais. Sa conception de la « pleine conscience » s’applique aussi bien aux tâches les plus humbles qu’à sa conception politique du monde. Une vision selon laquelle nous sommes liés aux autres hommes, mais aussi à la nature. Cette première biographie du maître révèle la richesse de son parcours : son engagement contre la guerre du Viêt Nam, son amitié avec Martin Luther King, son combat pacifique en faveur des boat-people ou sa main tendue aux vétérans américains, mais aussi la vigueur de son legs spirituel.

Réf. Bernard Baudouin & Céline Chadelat, Thich Nhat Hanh, une vie en pleine conscience, Paris, Presses du Châtelet, 2016. EAN : 9782845926417

Source : Presses du Châtelet

 

The Vietnam Center and Archive : “1967 – The Search for Peace”

[ndlr] Appel à communications.

vietnamcentrearchive_logo

ipac_logo

Conference Call for Papers and Panels
“1967: The Search for Peace”

April 28-29, 2017, Lubbock, Texas

 

The Vietnam Center and Archive and the newly-created Institute for Peace & Conflict (IPAC) at Texas Tech University are pleased to announce a conference focused on the year 1967 and the search for peace in Vietnam. We hope and expect in this conference to approach the events of 1967 in the broadest possible manner by hosting presentations not only on the antiwar and peace movements at home and abroad, but also on efforts to end the conflict through international diplomacy as well as military and diplomatic means in Vietnam and Southeast Asia.

Recent scholarship has focused on 1967 as a pivotal year in the Vietnam War, as the broad consensus that had supported the war in its early years started to break down and the country fractured over whether the United States could successfully achieve its stated objectives in Vietnam. In streets and on campuses across America, critics of the war demanded an immediate U.S. withdrawal—a position rejected by the Johnson administration as naïve and irresponsible. In April, Martin Luther King became the most famous opponent of the war, much to the chagrin of President Johnson. Behind closed doors, an increasing number of officials within the administration began to question official U.S. strategy and they looked for ways to change course. In May, the Civil Operations and Revolutionary Development Support (CORDS) was created to hopefully “pacify” the rural areas controlled by NLF and PAVN troops, and win the “hearts and minds” of the villagers. In a speech in San Antonio in September of that year, President Johnson offered to suspend the bombing campaign in exchange for concessions from North Vietnam, prefiguring his more famous offer of a bombing pause announced in the wake of the Tet Offensive the following year. Meanwhile, a force increase to 480,000 troops, operations such as Cedar Falls, Junction City and Rolling Thunder had not defeated the will of the enemy to continue fighting. The depth of this divide behind closed doors was perhaps symbolized most profoundly by the resignation of Secretary of Defense Robert McNamara that fall. While this conference will reflect upon the 50th anniversary of all of the events that took place during that critical year, we also encourage the submission of papers and panels that will address the theme of peace over the course of the war from as many perspectives as possible.

This two-day conference will be hosted at the Clarion Hotel and Conference Center in Lubbock, Texas. Conference organizers welcome both individual presentation proposals as well as pre-organized panel proposals that include two to three presentations. Conference sessions will follow the standard 90-minute format to include 60 minutes for presentations and 30 minutes for questions and discussion. Presentations by veterans are especially encouraged as are presentations by graduate students. Graduate student travel grants will be made available to select students.

Proposal submission deadline is January 15, 2017. Please submit a 250 word abstract and separate two-page CV/resume to 1967vietnamconference@gmail.com. The program committee of Justin Hart, Dave Lewis, Steve Maxner, Laura Calkins, and Ron Milam will evaluate all paper proposals and develop a program that reflects the many remarkable aspects of 1967. If submitting a panel proposal, please include separate abstracts for each proposed presentation and CVs/resumes for each speaker.

Thank you for your interest in participating in this conference.

Source : Steve Maxner / VSG

The Indochinese Refugee Movement and the Launch of Canada’s Private Sponsorship Program

[ndlr] Signalement d’un numéro spécial sur l’Indochine dans Refuge,  la Revue canadienne sur les réfugiés (Vol. 32, n° 2). Tous les articles sont téléchargeables en PDF.

refugevol-32no-2_uneCliquer sur l’image pour accéder à la revue

Introduction

Michael J. Molloy, James C. Simeon

Articles

Priscilla Koh
Anh Ngo
Anna N. Vu, Vic Satzewich
Michael Casasola
Robert C. Batarseh
Shauna Labman
Giovanna Roma

Book Reviews

Vincent K. Her
Diana M. Dean
Judy Ledgerwood
Antje Missbach
Amar Wahab
Alexandra Kent
 Print Copy
Refuge 32.2 (Special Issue) Print Copy

Image « à la une » : A Vietnamese mother and her children wade across a river, fleeing a bombing raid on Qui Nhon by United States aircraft on Sept. 7, 1965 © Kyoichi Sawada—Bettmann/Corbis

Vidéo : Facebook rétablit la photo de la petite vietnamienne brûlée au napalm

[ndlr] Vu sur la toile.

Source : France 24

Voir aussi :

Image « à la une » : la photo de la petite Kim Phuc brulée au napalm prise par Nick Ut en 1972 © Nick Ut