Commemoration of the 50th Anniversary of the Vietnam War – Questions…

[ndlr] Alors que le gouvernement Obama a entamé depuis mai 2012 un programme de 13 ans de commémoration de la guerre du Viêt-Nam, pour un montant de 65 millions de dollars, quelques voix s’élèvent pour rappeler le coût terrible de cette guerre sur bien des plans : humain, écologique, économique, psychologique, géopolitique. Nous signalons ci-dessous l’article de l’activiste new-yorkais Howard Machtinger posté sur le blog de Tom Hayden, suivi d’un article de Mark A. Ashwill, auteur américain de Vietnam Today: A Guide to a Nation at a Crossroads (avec Thai Ngoc Diep) qui vit actuellement à Hanoi. Les deux textes interpellent sans ménagement les Etats-Unis sur cet enjeu mémoriel, sa signification et sa légitimité. Ces deux textes sont précédés du discours officiel de Barak Obama inaugurant cette campagne mémorielle.

Vietnam War Memorial © unit8rafaelL11
Vietnam War Memorial © unit8rafaelL11

* * *

Presidential Proclamation — Commemoration of the 50th Anniversary of the Vietnam War

COMMEMORATION OF THE 50TH ANNIVERSARY OF THE VIETNAM WAR
– – – – – – –
BY THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA
A PROCLAMATION

As we observe the 50th anniversary of the Vietnam War, we reflect with solemn reverence upon the valor of a generation that served with honor. We pay tribute to the more than 3 million servicemen and women who left their families to serve bravely, a world away from everything they knew and everyone they loved. From Ia Drang to Khe Sanh, from Hue to Saigon and countless villages in between, they pushed through jungles and rice paddies, heat and monsoon, fighting heroically to protect the ideals we hold dear as Americans. Through more than a decade of combat, over air, land, and sea, these proud Americans upheld the highest traditions of our Armed Forces.

As a grateful Nation, we honor more than 58,000 patriots –their names etched in black granite — who sacrificed all they had and all they would ever know. We draw inspiration from the heroes who suffered unspeakably as prisoners of war, yet who returned home with their heads held high. We pledge to keep faith with those who were wounded and still carry the scars of war, seen and unseen. With more than 1,600 of our service members still among the missing, we pledge as a Nation to do everything in our power to bring these patriots home. In the reflection of The Wall, we see the military family members and veterans who carry a pain that may never fade. May they find peace in knowing their loved ones endure, not only in medals and memories, but in the hearts of all Americans, who are forever grateful for their service, valor, and sacrifice.

In recognition of a chapter in our Nation’s history that must never be forgotten, let us renew our sacred commitment to those who answered our country’s call in Vietnam and those who awaited their safe return. Beginning on Memorial Day 2012, the Federal Government will partner with local governments, private organizations, and communities across America to participate in the Commemoration of the 50th Anniversary of the Vietnam War — a 13-year program to honor and give thanks to a generation of proud Americans who saw our country through one of the most challenging missions we have ever faced. While no words will ever be fully worthy of their service, nor any honor truly befitting their sacrifice, let us remember that it is never too late to pay tribute to the men and women who answered the call of duty with courage and valor. Let us renew our commitment to the fullest possible accounting for those who have not returned.

Throughout this Commemoration, let us strive to live up to their example by showing our Vietnam veterans, their families, and all who have served the fullest respect and support of a grateful Nation.

NOW, THEREFORE, I, BARACK OBAMA, President of the United States of America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by the Constitution and the laws of the United States, do hereby proclaim May 28, 2012, through November 11, 2025, as the Commemoration of the 50th Anniversary of the Vietnam War. I call upon Federal, State, and local officials to honor our Vietnam veterans, our fallen, our wounded, those unaccounted for, our former prisoners of war, their families, and all who served with appropriate programs, ceremonies, and activities.

IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this twenty-fifth day of May, in the year of our Lord two thousand twelve, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and thirty-sixth.

BARACK OBAMA

Source : The White House, Office of the Press Secretary, 25/05/2012.

* * *

Commemorating the American War in Vietnam

Most peace advocates are unaware that our government has commenced a 13-year program of commemorating the Vietnam War at a cost of $65 million. The effort seems focused primarily on the sacrifices made by American troops in a battle for American ideals. There is nothing revealed about Vietnamese nationalism, sacrifice, casualties or ultimate success – not to mention the ongoing deprivation, Agent Orange poisonings, cluster bombs left behind as signs of inhumanity. Nor is there mention of the peace movement, the historic rallies, the unity across racial lines, the GI revolts inside the armed forces, the unconstitutional domestic spying and indictments, the McGovern campaign, or the Pentagon Papers.

Clearly the National Security State is attempting to win on the field of American memory what was lost on the battlefield. Since the struggle for memory shapes our future choices, it is important that peace activists engage in this debate wherever possible.

Below is recent speech by longtime New York progressive activist Howie Machtinger, “Commemorating the American War in Viet Nam.”

Read more / Lire la suite : Tom Hayden, The Peace & Justice Resource Center, 30/04/2013.

* * *

The 50th Anniversary of the Vietnam War: Revising the Past, Revisiting the Lies

In his proclamation that set the stage for this commemoration of the 50th anniversary of the Vietnam War President Obama noted that:

We pay tribute to the more than 3 million servicemen and women who left their families to serve bravely, a world away from everything they knew and everyone they loved. From Ia Drang to Khe Sanh, from Hue to Saigon and countless villages in between, they pushed through jungles and rice paddies, heat and monsoon, fighting heroically to protect the ideals we hold dear as Americans.

Instead of a historical whitewash, why not take this opportunity, perhaps one of the last in this overwrought national melodrama, to indulge in some long overdue soul-searching and ask the hard questions? Why not make an honest and concerted effort to deal with, learn from, but also overcome the past? Why not confront the monstrous reality that the Vietnam War, or the American War, as it’s logically known in Vietnam, was unjust, unnecessary, and immoral?

Read more / Lire la suite : Huffington P0st, 09/04/2013.



Citer ce billet
indomemoires (2013, 9 mai). Commemoration of the 50th Anniversary of the Vietnam War – Questions… Mémoires d'Indochine. Consulté le 12 avril 2024, à l’adresse https://doi.org/10.58079/q4yq