Tâm T. T. Ngô: The New Way – Protestantism and the Hmong in Vietnam

[ndlr] Nouvelle publication sur la religion et la communauté Hmong au Viêt-Nam. Présentation de l’éditeur.

Tam T. T. Ngo, The New Way: Protestantism and the Hmong in Vietnam, Seattle, University of Washington Press, 2016.

TamTTNgo_TheNewWay

In the mid-1980s, a radio program with a compelling spiritual message was accidentally received by listeners in Vietnam’s remote northern highlands. The Protestant evangelical communication had been created in the Hmong language by the Far East Broadcasting Company specifically for war refugees in Laos. The Vietnamese Hmong related the content to their traditional expectation of salvation by a Hmong messiah-king who would lead them out of subjugation, and they appropriated the evangelical message for themselves.

Today, the New Way (Kev Cai Tshiab) has some three hundred thousand followers in Vietnam. Tam T. T. Ngo reveals the complex politics of religion and ethnic relations in contemporary Vietnam and illuminates the dynamic interplay between local and global forces, socialist and postsocialist state building, cold war and post-cold war antagonisms, Hmong transnationalism, and U.S.-led evangelical expansionism.

Tam T. T. Ngo is a research fellow in the department of religious diversity at the Max Planck Institute for the Study of Religious and Ethnic Diversity in Germany.

* * *

“Conversion to evangelical Protestantism by members of the Hmong community in Vietnam raises a host of questions: the impact of conversion on individual converts and non-converts; the relationship between Protestant eschatology and Hmong millenarianism; relations between the Hmong and the state; the transformation of this marginal community into the center of the Hmong diasporic imagination through radio broadcasts and US-based missionaries. This ethnographically rich and theoretically sophisticated study is a major contribution to a wide range of disciplines.”
-Hue-Tam Ho-Tai, Harvard University

 Source : University of Washington Press

Mei Feng Mok: “Negotiating Community and Nation in Chợ Lớn: Nation-building, Community-building and Transnationalism in Everyday Life during the Republic of Việt Nam, 1955-1975”

[ndlr] Présentation par Christoph Giebel de la thèse de Mei Feng Mok sur Cholon et sa population sous la République du Viêt-Nam de 1955 à 1975. Chronique publiée avec l’autorisation de son auteur.

Ref.: Mei Feng Mok, Negotiating Community and Nation in Chợ Lớn: Nation-building, Community-building and Transnationalism in Everyday Life during the Republic of Việt Nam, 1955-1975, University of Washington, History, PhD thesis, Chair: Christoph Giebel, 2016.

It is with great pleasure that I announce to VSG a newly minted Ph.D.

On 8 June 2016, at the History department of the University of Washington, Seattle (USA), Mei Feng Mok successfully defended her dissertation “Negotiating Community and Nation in Chợ Lớn: Nation-building, Community-building and Transnationalism in Everyday Life during the Republic of Việt Nam, 1955-1975.”  The dissertation is based on a variety of sources in Vietnamese, Chinese, French and English, most notably rare and rarely-used Chinese-language newspapers from Chợ Lớn.  Examiners were Laurie Sears, Sasha Welland, and Christoph Giebel (chair);  Moon-ho Jung and Madeleine Dong added guidance at earlier stages of research.  Before coming to UW, Mei Feng Mok earned an MA in History at the National University of Singapore (NUS) with Bruce Lockhart.

Focusing on social life ordered around markets, native place congregations and temples, schools and work places, hospitals and medicinal halls, sports clubs and restaurants, private homes and public leisure places, Mei Feng deftly provides a rich tapestry of Chợ Lớn’s Chinese community, particularly its middle class, and the changes it underwent over time.  She situates Chợ Lớn in multiple relations: as one center of greater Sài Gòn, economic conduit for the southern Vietnamese hinterlands, socio-cultural hub for Chinese communities throughout Indochina, nodal point in transnational Chinese exchanges linking San Francisco, Hong Kong, China, and Singapore, and contributor to Cold War-era and Taiwan/ROC-centric sinophonic articulations.

The dissertation is organized into four main chapters:  

  • 1) Chợ Lớn’s built environment and human geography, its lived and shared spaces;  
  • 2) Education from kindergarten to adult learning between local and transnational networks and the state;  
  • 3) Sports and competitions over disciplining bodies and controlling social time;  
  • and 4) young adulthood, women in the public sphere, and socialization into multi-layered networks through marriage, work, philanthropy, and other ways of accumulating and spending social capital. 

Here Chợ Lớn emerges as a site of contestation between diasporic community interests, a “nation-building” Vietnamese state, and the transnational Chinese world not easily negotiated by individuals and further complicated by war, violence, and ideological divisions.

 Mei Feng’s work is bound to make significant contributions to a variety of fields:  e.g., to social history (and here everyday urban life) of which Việt Nam Studies are still desperately starved, to the growing body of studies on the Republic of Việt Nam (and a rare one where the RVN simply “is” rather than “fails”), to conversations about diasporic/minority communities with multiple identities in Việt Nam (and elsewhere), and to our knowledge of overseas Chinese and the dynamic currents in the Cold War-era transnational Chinese world.  Mei Feng will now take her talents and work to a Post-doctoral Fellowship position at the Asia Research Institute (ARI) in Singapore (NUS) where this important and exciting dissertation may well turn into a marvelous book.

 
Congratulations to Dr. Mei Feng Mok!
 
C. Giebel

UW-Seattle

Source : VSG

Image “à la une” : Le marché de Binh Tây à Cholon en 1960.

Hoang Ngo: Building a New House for the Buddha: Buddhist Social Engagement and Revival in Vietnam, 1927-1951 – PhD

[ndlr] Presentation de Christoph Giebel de la thèse de Hoang Ngo sur le bouddhisme socialement engagé des années 1927-1951, une période rarement considérée. Chronique publiée avec l’autorisation de son auteur.

Ref.: Hoang Ngo, Building a New House for the Buddha: Buddhist Social Engagement and Revival in Vietnam, 1927-1951, Chair: Christoph Giebel.

Now that most of us have begun the new academic year around the world, I am very pleased to make the following announcement:

Recently, in the University of Washington (Seattle) History department, Hoang Ngo successfully defended his dissertation “Building a New House for the Buddha: Buddhist Social Engagement and Revival in Vietnam, 1927-1951.”  The dissertation is based on extensive archival and library research in Viet Nam and France; it was supervised by Laurie Sears, Raymond Jonas, and Christoph Giebel (chair), and earlier also by Professor Emeritus Charles “Biff” Keyes.

The dissertation investigates in particular social engagement of Vietnamese Buddhists, in itself the product of the Buddhist revival emerging in the 1920s. During the revival, Vietnamese Buddhists attempted to remake their religion into a this-worldly Buddhism, establishing Buddhist associations and monastic schools and publishing periodicals to propagate the Dharma. Their goal was to use Buddhism to effectively deal with the colonization of the country by the French and the challenges posed by colonial modernity.

Hoang follows in great detail the debates within and among the emerging Buddhist associations of Cochinchina, Annam, and Tonkin, particularly during the 1930s and early 1940s when new ideas and profound change caused much excitement and activities as well as great anxieties and self-doubt.  What was the best way to propagate the Dharma among the masses?  How could one separate the “true” monk from the “fake”?  What was to be the proper balance between the sangha and the laity?  How could Buddhist associations organize themselves and operate effectively within an all-encompassing colonial order of control?  What role was there for revived Buddhism in the national(ist) struggle?  These and other questions fueled an explosion of intense debates, both in personal interactions as well as in various print media, over doctrinal, organizational and institutional aspects of Buddhism.

Despite personal and institutional rivalries, tensions between leading monks,  newly empowered lay people, and French authority, and persistent regional divisions, the ideal of a unified, all-Vietnamese Buddhist organization remained a long-standing, if elusive goal.  Unity, however, would come about only in the twilight of the colonial empire and the early years of the Cold War, and via the catalyst of the World Buddhist Conference in Sri Lanka.  In an epilogue, Hoang links the (short-lived) moment of unity in 1951 to the Buddhist Struggle Movement in the 1960s Republic, the subject of his earlier, pre-dissertation work.  At the end of a rigorous and vigorous defense, Hoang’s committee urged him to turn this important and richly documented dissertation into a full-fledged book manuscript.

Congratulations to Dr. Hoang Ngo!
C. Giebel

UW-Seattle, USA

Source : VSG

Thèse en ligne (PDF) téléchargeable sur le site de l’Université de Washington : https://digital.lib.washington.edu/researchworks/handle/1773/33976

The 5th International Conference on Vietnam Studies, Hanoi 15-18 December 2016

[ndlr] Annonce de la tenue de la 5e Conférence international des études vietnamiennes programmées à Hanoi en décembre 2016. Appel à candidature.

The 5th International Conference on Vietnam Studies, Hanoi

Sustainable Development in the Context of Global Change

FIRST ANNOUNCEMENT

We are pleased to announce that 5th International Conference on Vietnam Studies will be organized in Hanoi from 15th to 18th December 2016. We welcome all scientists, policy makers and entrepreneurship leaders to participate in and contribute papers to the Conference.

Goals of the Conference

  • To establish an international academic forum for discussing and proposing solutions to contemporary issues that Vietnam is experiencing in the context of global change.
  • To promote the development of the global network of Vietnam Studies, which gathers and connects researchers and experts from various fields of study and different countries with the aim at establishing an international organization on Vietnam Studies.

Theme of the Conference: Sustainable Development in the Context of Global Change

Host Organization: Vietnam National University, Hanoi (VNU, Hanoi).

Collaborating organizations: Vietnam Academy of Social Sciences; Vietnam Academy of Science and Technology; Vietnam National University, Ho Chi Minh City; Ministry of Education and Training; Ministry of Science and Technology; Ministry of Foreign Affairs; Ministry of Culture, Sports and Tourism; Ministry of Industry and Trade; Ministry of Planning and Investment; Ministry of Agriculture and Rural Development; Ministry of Labor, Invalids and Social Affairs; Ministry of Natural Resources and Environment.

Steering Committee

  1. Mr. Phùng Xuân Nhạ –Minister of Education and Training, President of VNU Hanoi
  2. Mr. Phạm Công Tạc – Deputy Minister, Ministry of Science and Technology
  3. Mr. Huỳnh Thành Đạt – Vice President of Vietnam National University, Ho Chi Minh City
  4. Mr. Nguyễn Quang Thuấn – Vice President of Vietnam Academy of Social Sciences
  5. Mr. Phan Văn Kiệm, Vice President of Vietnam Academy of Science and Technology
  6. Mr. Nguyễn Hữu Đức – Vice President of Vietnam National University, Hanoi

International Advisory Board

  1. Paul Chan – HELP University, Malaysia
  2. Vu Minh Giang – Vietnam National University, Hanoi, Vietnam
  3. Jeffrey Gross – Arizona State University, USA
  4. Nguyen Duc Khuong, IPAG Business School, France
  5. Phan Huy Le – Vietnam Association of Historians
  6. Furuta Motoo – Vietnam Japan University, Japan
  7. Charles C. Nguyen – The Catholic University of America, USA
  8. Luu Tran Tieu – National Culture Heritage Committee, Vietnam
  9. Tran Van Tho – Waseda University, Japan

Scope of the Conference

Section 1: Foreign relations, international cooperation and integration

  • Vietnam in an emerging regional order
  • Vietnam and ASEAN Communities
  • Towards regional cooperation for peace and security in Bien Dong
  • Cultural foreign relations
  • Vietnam’s participation in international organizations and forums
  • The role of Vietnamese communities abroad
  • Vietnam and TPP

Section 2: Cultural resources

  • Current condition of culture in Vietnam
  • Structure, methodologies and directions for developing cultural resources
  • Cultural exchange and acculturation
  • Development of Vietnamese core values
  • Culture and entertainment industry in Vietnam
  • Dignity, personality, lifestyle and trends

Section 3: Education and training and human resource development

  • Policies and resources for education
  • National education system
  • National Qualification Framework and capability of Vietnam human resource in joining global labour market
  • Creativity education and startup
  • Technologies for blended learning
  • Training and continuing training for teacher
  • Building a learning society

Section 4: Technology and knowledge transfer

  • Policy and resources for development of science and technology market
  • Strategic technologies of Vietnam
  • National innovation system
  • Ecosystem of entrepreneurship

Section 5: Economy and Livelihood

  • Vietnam macro-economy
  • Vietnam economic sectors/industries
  • Vietnam Enterprises
  • Labor and employment in Vietnam
  • Income and social equality
  • Environment, immigration, urbanization, green economy and inclusive growth

Section 6: Climate change

  • The current status, trends, impacts, vulnerability and opportunities
  • Assessment and forecast of capabilities and solutions for adaptation and resistance to climate change; economic and adaptive livelihood models
  • Assessment and forecast of greenhouse gas emissions; solutions and economic models for climate change mitigation
  • Responding to climate change and sustainable development model

Time and Location

  • Time: 15-18th December, 2016
  • Location: National Convention Centre, Hanoi

Language

Vietnamese and English

Publication and Presentation of Papers

  • Accepted papers will be selected to be presented in different sections and published in VNU Journal of Science, the Conference’s proceedings and relevant Scopus-indexed journals.
  • The selection of contributions for oral presentations will be done based on the evaluation and recommendation of the Scientific Committee.

Registration and Paper Submission

  • Registration form and paper abstracts to be submitted by 15st June, 2016
  • Announcement of accepted papers: 20th June 2016
  • Full-text paper to be submitted by 15th October, 2016
  • Email addresses for sending registration form, abstracts and full-text papers:
  • Keynote and invited speakers are considered to be funded with accommodation and travel expenses.
  • Invitation letter and related supporting documents will be provided for international delegates’ visa application when required.

Contact Information

  • Website: http://icvs2016.vnu.edu.vn
  • Mailing address: Room 706, D2 building, 144 Xuân Thủy Street, Cầu Giấy District, Hanoi, Vietnam.
  • Telephone: (+84 – 4) 37547670, ext 726. E-mail: icvs@vnu.edu.vn

Information of the Conference will be posted and updated on the Conference website.

Source : ICVS 2016

Gregg Huff: Vietnam’s 1944-1945 Famine – Explanations, Responsibility and Revolution

[ndlr] Séminaire de l’IAO.

Mercredi 08 juin 2016
Salle de réunion de l’IAO (R66), de 14h à 15h30

“Vietnam’s 1944-1945 Famine : Explanations, Responsibility and Revolution”

Gregg Huff, Pembroke College, University of Oxford, England

This paper provides the first quantitative analysis of Vietnam’s 1944-1945 great famine which claimed the lives of over a million people in Tonkin and North Annam and was instrumental in the August 1945 Viet Minh and communist revolution. Competing and hitherto unsatisfactory explanations have put the famine down to the weather, French or Japanese administrative failures, and US aerial bombardment. I show that famine, although made worse by wartime events, resulted from successive typhoons that struck coastal areas and was caused by a consequent food availability deficit. Econometric analysis reveals that differences in endowments and entitlements largely explain who died.

SeminaireIAO_2016_06_08

Source : IAO

Image “à la une” : photographie de Vo An Ninh, témoin de la famine en 1945 : Tận mắt xem 19 bức ảnh về nạn đói năm 1945 của cố nghệ sĩ Võ An Ninh (Giao Duc Viet Nam, 11/06/2012)

Brenda M. Boyle and Jeehyun Lim, eds.: Looking Back on the Vietnam War – Twenty-First Century Perspectives

[ndlr] Parution d’un ouvrage collectif dans lequel les perspectives vietnamiennes sont prépondérantes. Présentation de l’éditeur.

LookingBackOnTheVietnamWarMore than forty years have passed since the official end of the Vietnam War, yet the war’s legacies endure. Its history and iconography still provide fodder for film and fiction, communities of war refugees have spawned a wide Vietnamese diaspora, and the United States military remains embroiled in unwinnable wars with eerie echoes of Vietnam.

Looking Back on the Vietnam War brings together scholars from a broad variety of disciplines, who offer fresh insights on the war’s psychological, economic, artistic, political, and environmental impacts. Each essay examines a different facet of the war, from its representation in Marvel comic books to the experiences of Vietnamese soldiers exposed to Agent Orange. By putting these pieces together, the contributors assemble an expansive yet nuanced composite portrait of the war and its global legacies.

Though they come from diverse scholarly backgrounds, ranging from anthropology to film studies, the contributors are united in their commitment to original research. Whether exploring rare archives or engaging in extensive interviews, they voice perspectives that have been excluded from standard historical accounts. Looking Back on the Vietnam War thus embarks on an interdisciplinary and international investigation to discover what we remember about the war, how we remember it, and why.

Contributors

Brenda Boyle, Jeehyun Lim, Yen Le Espiritu, Quan Tue Tran, Viet Thanh Nguyen, Lan Duong, Vinh Nguyen, Robert Mason, Leonie Jones, Heonik Kwon, Diane Niblack Fox, Cathy Schlund-Vials

Table Of Contents

Chronology

Note on the Text

Introduction: Looking Back at the Vietnam War / Brenda M. Boyle and Jeehyun Lim

  • Chapter 1: Vietnamese Refugees and Internet Memorials: When Does War End and Who Gets to Decide? / Yên Lê Espiritu
  • Chapter 2: Broken, but Not Forsaken: Disabled South Vietnamese Veterans in Vietnam and the Vietnamese Diaspora / Quan Tue Tran
  • Chapter 3: What Is Vietnamese American Literature? / Viet Thanh Nguyen
  • Chapter 4: Viet Nam and the Diaspora: Absence, Presence, and the Archive / Lan Duong
  • Chapter 5: Liberal Humanitarianism and Post–Cold War Cultural Politics: The Case of Le Ly Hayslip / Jeehyun Lim
  • Chapter 6: Ann Hui’s Boat People: Documenting Vietnamese Refugees in Hong Kong / Vinh Nguyen
  • Chapter 7: “The Deep Black Hole”: Vietnam in the Memories of Australian Veterans and Refugees / Robert Mason and Leonie Jones
  • Chapter 8: Missing Bodies and Homecoming Spirits / Heonik Kwon
  • Chapter 9: Agent Orange: Toxic Chemical, Narrative of Suffering, Metaphor for War / Diane Niblack Fox
  • Chapter 10: Re-Seeing Cambodia and Recollecting The ’Nam: A Vertiginous Critique of the Military Sublime / Cathy J. Schlund-Vials
  • Chapter 11: Naturalizing War: The Stories We Tell about the Vietnam War / Brenda M. Boyle

Appendix A: Archives

Appendix B: Publications since 2000

Notes on Contributors

Index

Source : Rutgers University Press

Ảnh độc về đạo Cao Đài ở miền Nam năm 1930 [Walter Bosshard]

[ndlr] Images rares du photographe suisse Walter Bosshard (1892-1975) sur le Caodaïsme en 1930. Le temple d’origine de Tây Ninh en 1930 quatre ans après la création de la religion. Il fut reconstruit en 1947 dans l’architecture que l’on connaît aujourd’hui. Aperçu.

Voir la suite : Kien Thuc (30/05/2016)

La décolonisation et la guerre vécues par les populations du Viêt-Nam, du Laos et du Cambodge

Rechercher dans OpenEdition Search

Vous allez être redirigé vers OpenEdition Search