Archives par mot-clé : impérialisme

Christopher Goscha : The Penguin History of Modern Vietnam

[ndlr] Parution en paperback de l’ouvrage de Christopher Goscha chez Penguin à un prix abordable pour les étudiants, les voyageurs, les passionnés… Une lecture à ne pas manquer.

Notre avis : en 14 chapitres (688 p.) et basé sur une historiographie récente et nouvelle, cet ouvrage rebat les cartes de notre compréhension de l’histoire du Viêt-Nam. Au fil de son analyse multiscalaire l’auteur prend « de la hauteur » pour considérer cette histoire sous un jour nouveau. La hauteur de vue est un point clé de cette étude à la fois attractive, détachée des vieilles problématiques vietnamo-centrées ou téléologiques, et ouvrant sur de nouvelles perspectives de recherche. Pour démêler cet écheveau complexe « des Viêt Nams » entrelacés qui ont marqué l’histoire moderne et contemporaine, il fallait ce regard à la fois profond et distancié. FG

‘This is the finest single-volume history of Vietnam in English. It challenges myths, and raises questions about the socialist republic’s political future’ Guardian

‘Powerful and compelling. Vietnam will be of growing importance in the twenty-first-century world, particularly as China and the US rethink their roles in Asia. Christopher Goscha’s book is a brilliant account of that country’s history.’ – Rana Mitter

‘A vigorous, eye-opening account of a country of great importance to the world, past and future’ – Kirkus Reviews

Over the centuries the Vietnamese have beenboth colonizers themselves and the victims of colonization by others. Their country expanded, shrunk, split and sometimes disappeared, often under circumstances far beyond their control. Despite these often overwhelming pressures, Vietnam has survived as one of Asia’s most striking and complex cultures.

As more and more visitors come to this extraordinary country, there has been for some years a need for a major history – a book which allows the outsider to understand the many layers left by earlier emperors, rebels, priests and colonizers. Christopher Goscha’s new work amply fills this role. Drawing on a lifetime of thinking about Indo-China, he has created a narrative which is consistently seen from ‘inside’ Vietnam but never loses sight of the connections to the ‘outside’. As wave after wave of invaders – whether Chinese, French, Japanese or American – have been ultimately expelled, we see the terrible cost to the Vietnamese themselves. Vietnam’s role in one of the Cold War’s longest conflicts has meant that its past has been endlessly abused for propaganda purposes and it is perhaps only now that the events which created the modern state can be seen from a truly historical perspective.

Christopher Goscha draws on the latest research and discoveries in Vietnamese, French and English. His book is a major achievement, describing both the grand narrative of Vietnam’s story but also the byways, curiosities, differences, cultures and peoples that have done so much over the centuries to define the many versions of Vietnam.

Source : Penguin

Christopher Goscha : The 30-Years War in Vietnam

[ndlr] Signalement d’un article en ligne de notre collègue Christopher Goscha, professeur à l’UQAM. Rubrique : Vietnam ’67/// Historians, veterans and journalists recall 1967 in Vietnam, a year that changed the war and changed America.

vietnam67It should go without saying that the Vietnam War is remembered by different people in very different ways. Most Americans remember it as a war fought between 1965 and 1975 that bogged down their military in a struggle to prevent the Communists from marching into Southeast Asia, deeply dividing Americans as it did. The French remember their loss there as a decade-long conflict, fought from 1945 to 1954, when they tried to hold on to the Asian pearl of their colonial empire until losing it in a place called Dien Bien Phu.

The Vietnamese, in contrast, see the war as a national liberation struggle, or as a civil conflict, depending on which side they were on, ending in victory in 1975 for one side and tragedy for the other. For the Vietnamese, it was above all a 30-year conflict transforming direct and indirect forms of fighting into a brutal conflagration, one that would end up claiming over three million Vietnamese lives.

The point is not that one perspective is better or more accurate than the other. What’s important, rather, is to understand how the colonial war, the civil war and the Cold War intertwined to produce such a deadly conflagration by 1967.

Lire la suite : The New York Times, 07/02/2017.

Image « à la une » : Prise du PC-GONO par les soldats Vietminh de la division 316 dans la soirée du 7 mai 1954. © AFP/VNA

Christopher Goscha: « Towards a History of Modern Vietnam » [Cornell University]

[ndlr] Excellente conférence de notre collègue Christopher Goscha à l’occasion de la présentation de son nouvel ouvrage sur le Viêt-Nam. Une nouvelle histoire pour comprendre la pluralité du Viêt-Nam d’aujourd’hui et comment ce pays s’est construit culturellement, géographiquement, humainement.

Cornell Voices on Vietnam Spring 2016 Speakers’ Series presents  Professor Christopher Goscha (Professor of History at Université du Québec à Montréal) – « Towards a History of Modern Vietnam. » Recorded May 5, 2016.

This event is co-sponsored by Southeast Asia Program, the Department of Asian Studies, the Department of History and the Department of Government.

Acclaimed historian and Vietnam specialist Christopher Goscha discusses his latest work, The Penguin History of Modern Vietnam (2016). Popular impressions of Vietnam are still largely dominated by the Vietnam War, with most English-language accounts focused on American experiences, sources, and perspectives. But Vietnam’s history is much richer and more complex than a mere Cold War confrontation, complete with expansion, schisms, colonial conquest and subjugation, cultural renaissance, and revolution.

Drawing on research and discoveries from a host of Vietnamese-language and global sources, Professor Goscha outlines a rich and compelling overview of modern Vietnamese history, portraying a cast of memorable characters – from Emperors to rebels, poets to priests – and providing a fascinating look at the intricacies and complexities of modern Vietnamese history. Compelling for scholars and non-specialists alike, The Penguin History of Modern Vietnam represents the first English-language general history of contemporary Vietnam.

Source : Voices On Vietnam