Archives par mot-clé : guerre du Viêt Nam

Sophie Quinn-Judge : The Third Force in the Vietnam War: The Elusive Search for Peace 1954-75 [parution]

[ndlr] Avis de parution d’une nouvelle étude l’historienne Sophie Quinn-Judge. Présentation de l’éditeur.

It was the conflict that shocked America and the world, but the struggle for peace is central to the history of the Vietnam War. Rejecting the idea that war between Hanoi and the US was inevitable, the author traces North Vietnam’s programs for a peaceful reunification of their nation from the 1954 Geneva negotiations up to the final collapse of the Saigon government in 1975. She also examines the ways that groups and personalities in South Vietnam responded by crafting their own peace proposals, in the hope that the Vietnamese people could solve their disagreements by engaging in talks without outside interference. While most of the writing on peacemaking during the Vietnam War concerns high-level international diplomacy, Sophie Quinn-Judge reminds us of the courageous efforts of southern Vietnamese, including Buddhists, Catholics, students and citizens, to escape the unprecedented destruction that the US war brought to their people. The author contends that US policymakers showed little regard for the attitudes of the South Vietnamese population when they took over the war effort in 1964 and sent in their own troops to fight it in 1965.

A unique contribution of this study is the interweaving of developments in South Vietnamese politics with changes in the balance of power in Hanoi; both of the Vietnamese combatants are shown to evolve towards greater rigidity as the war progresses, while the US grows increasingly committed to President Thieu in Saigon, after the election of Richard Nixon. Not even the signing of the 1973 Paris Peace Agreement could blunt US support for Thieu and his obstruction of the peace process. The result was a difficult peace in 1975, achieved by military might rather than reconciliation, and a new realization of the limits of American foreign policy.

Sophie Quinn-Judge is the Associate Director of the Centre for Vietnamese History at Temple University. She was for many years a South East Asia correspondent for the Far Eastern Economic Review and for The Guardian. One of the foremost scholars of the Vietnam War, she taught for many years at the LSE and SOAS.

Ref. : Quinn-Judge, Sophie, The Third Force in the Vietnam War: The Elusive Search for Peace 1954-75, London, I.B.Tauris & Co Ltd, 2017, 336 p. ISBN: 9781784535971

Source : I.B.Tauris

 

Christopher Goscha : The 30-Years War in Vietnam

[ndlr] Signalement d’un article en ligne de notre collègue Christopher Goscha, professeur à l’UQAM. Rubrique : Vietnam ’67/// Historians, veterans and journalists recall 1967 in Vietnam, a year that changed the war and changed America.

vietnam67It should go without saying that the Vietnam War is remembered by different people in very different ways. Most Americans remember it as a war fought between 1965 and 1975 that bogged down their military in a struggle to prevent the Communists from marching into Southeast Asia, deeply dividing Americans as it did. The French remember their loss there as a decade-long conflict, fought from 1945 to 1954, when they tried to hold on to the Asian pearl of their colonial empire until losing it in a place called Dien Bien Phu.

The Vietnamese, in contrast, see the war as a national liberation struggle, or as a civil conflict, depending on which side they were on, ending in victory in 1975 for one side and tragedy for the other. For the Vietnamese, it was above all a 30-year conflict transforming direct and indirect forms of fighting into a brutal conflagration, one that would end up claiming over three million Vietnamese lives.

The point is not that one perspective is better or more accurate than the other. What’s important, rather, is to understand how the colonial war, the civil war and the Cold War intertwined to produce such a deadly conflagration by 1967.

Lire la suite : The New York Times, 07/02/2017.

Image « à la une » : Prise du PC-GONO par les soldats Vietminh de la division 316 dans la soirée du 7 mai 1954. © AFP/VNA

Tran Van Thuy and Le Thanh Dung : The Memoir of a Vietnamese Filmmaker in War and Peace [parution]

[ndlr] Traduction en anglais des mémoires du cinéaste Tran Van Thuy. Présentation de l’éditeur.

In Whose Eyes

The Memoir of a Vietnamese Filmmaker in War and Peace
A Vietnamese perspective on the Vietnam war and its legacies
tranvanthuy_inwhoseeyes

Trân Van Thuy is a celebrated Vietnamese filmmaker of more than twenty award-winning documentaries. A cameraman for the People’s Army of Vietnam during the Vietnam War, he went on to achieve international fame as the director of films that address the human costs of the war and its aftermath.

Thuy’s memoir, when published in Vietnam in 2013, immediately sold out. In this translation, English-language readers are now able to learn in rich detail about the life and work of this preeminent artist. Written in a gentle and charming style, the memoir is filled with reflections on war, peace, history, freedom of expression, and filmmaking. Thuy also offers a firsthand account of the war in Vietnam and its aftermath from a Vietnamese perspective, adding a dimension rarely encountered in English-language literature.

Source : University of Massachusetts Amherst

Thich Nhat Hanh, une vie en pleine conscience [parution]

[ndlr] Première biographie en langue française du vénérable Nhat Hanh (Thích Nhất Hạnh), actuellement âgé de 90 ans et retiré en Thaïlande. Présentation de l’éditeur.

thichnhathanh_biographieLa vie du moine Thich Nhât Hanh témoigne de la puissance de la paix. Né au Viêt Nam en 1926, il assiste à l’embrasement de son pays et aux guerres qui le ravagent. Moine à 16 ans, ce grand maître zen ne dissocie pas l’action politique et sociale de la pratique spirituelle. Mettant en valeur l’enseignement des maîtres, il s’élève pourtant contre les pesanteurs de la tradition et y apporte de profonds changements. Sa compassion dépasse toute vue partisane, son regard englobe et ne sépare jamais. Sa conception de la « pleine conscience » s’applique aussi bien aux tâches les plus humbles qu’à sa conception politique du monde. Une vision selon laquelle nous sommes liés aux autres hommes, mais aussi à la nature. Cette première biographie du maître révèle la richesse de son parcours : son engagement contre la guerre du Viêt Nam, son amitié avec Martin Luther King, son combat pacifique en faveur des boat-people ou sa main tendue aux vétérans américains, mais aussi la vigueur de son legs spirituel.

Réf. Bernard Baudouin & Céline Chadelat, Thich Nhat Hanh, une vie en pleine conscience, Paris, Presses du Châtelet, 2016. EAN : 9782845926417

Source : Presses du Châtelet

 

The Vietnam Center and Archive : “1967 – The Search for Peace”

[ndlr] Appel à communications.

vietnamcentrearchive_logo

ipac_logo

Conference Call for Papers and Panels
“1967: The Search for Peace”

April 28-29, 2017, Lubbock, Texas

 

The Vietnam Center and Archive and the newly-created Institute for Peace & Conflict (IPAC) at Texas Tech University are pleased to announce a conference focused on the year 1967 and the search for peace in Vietnam. We hope and expect in this conference to approach the events of 1967 in the broadest possible manner by hosting presentations not only on the antiwar and peace movements at home and abroad, but also on efforts to end the conflict through international diplomacy as well as military and diplomatic means in Vietnam and Southeast Asia.

Recent scholarship has focused on 1967 as a pivotal year in the Vietnam War, as the broad consensus that had supported the war in its early years started to break down and the country fractured over whether the United States could successfully achieve its stated objectives in Vietnam. In streets and on campuses across America, critics of the war demanded an immediate U.S. withdrawal—a position rejected by the Johnson administration as naïve and irresponsible. In April, Martin Luther King became the most famous opponent of the war, much to the chagrin of President Johnson. Behind closed doors, an increasing number of officials within the administration began to question official U.S. strategy and they looked for ways to change course. In May, the Civil Operations and Revolutionary Development Support (CORDS) was created to hopefully “pacify” the rural areas controlled by NLF and PAVN troops, and win the “hearts and minds” of the villagers. In a speech in San Antonio in September of that year, President Johnson offered to suspend the bombing campaign in exchange for concessions from North Vietnam, prefiguring his more famous offer of a bombing pause announced in the wake of the Tet Offensive the following year. Meanwhile, a force increase to 480,000 troops, operations such as Cedar Falls, Junction City and Rolling Thunder had not defeated the will of the enemy to continue fighting. The depth of this divide behind closed doors was perhaps symbolized most profoundly by the resignation of Secretary of Defense Robert McNamara that fall. While this conference will reflect upon the 50th anniversary of all of the events that took place during that critical year, we also encourage the submission of papers and panels that will address the theme of peace over the course of the war from as many perspectives as possible.

This two-day conference will be hosted at the Clarion Hotel and Conference Center in Lubbock, Texas. Conference organizers welcome both individual presentation proposals as well as pre-organized panel proposals that include two to three presentations. Conference sessions will follow the standard 90-minute format to include 60 minutes for presentations and 30 minutes for questions and discussion. Presentations by veterans are especially encouraged as are presentations by graduate students. Graduate student travel grants will be made available to select students.

Proposal submission deadline is January 15, 2017. Please submit a 250 word abstract and separate two-page CV/resume to 1967vietnamconference@gmail.com. The program committee of Justin Hart, Dave Lewis, Steve Maxner, Laura Calkins, and Ron Milam will evaluate all paper proposals and develop a program that reflects the many remarkable aspects of 1967. If submitting a panel proposal, please include separate abstracts for each proposed presentation and CVs/resumes for each speaker.

Thank you for your interest in participating in this conference.

Source : Steve Maxner / VSG

The Indochinese Refugee Movement and the Launch of Canada’s Private Sponsorship Program

[ndlr] Signalement d’un numéro spécial sur l’Indochine dans Refuge,  la Revue canadienne sur les réfugiés (Vol. 32, n° 2). Tous les articles sont téléchargeables en PDF.

refugevol-32no-2_uneCliquer sur l’image pour accéder à la revue

Introduction

Michael J. Molloy, James C. Simeon

Articles

Priscilla Koh
Anh Ngo
Anna N. Vu, Vic Satzewich
Michael Casasola
Robert C. Batarseh
Shauna Labman
Giovanna Roma

Book Reviews

Vincent K. Her
Diana M. Dean
Judy Ledgerwood
Antje Missbach
Amar Wahab
Alexandra Kent
 Print Copy
Refuge 32.2 (Special Issue) Print Copy

Image « à la une » : A Vietnamese mother and her children wade across a river, fleeing a bombing raid on Qui Nhon by United States aircraft on Sept. 7, 1965 © Kyoichi Sawada—Bettmann/Corbis

Vidéo : Facebook rétablit la photo de la petite vietnamienne brûlée au napalm

[ndlr] Vu sur la toile.

Source : France 24

Voir aussi :

Image « à la une » : la photo de la petite Kim Phuc brulée au napalm prise par Nick Ut en 1972 © Nick Ut

Décès du journaliste et documentariste Henri de Turenne (1921-2016)

[ndlr] La presse rend (un petit) hommage à ce journaliste d’exception. Rappelons à nos lectrices/lecteurs et/ou visiteurs qu’Henri de Turenne réalisa en 1984 une histoire du Viêt-Nam en 6 épisodes (en co-production internationale), une série jamais égalée à ce jour et à notre connaissance non éditée en DVD. Néanmoins disponible (provisoirement) sur YouTube, espérons qu’à l’occasion de sa disparition, cette série puisse voir le jour. A redécouvrir, une voix posée et un ton juste.

A lire :

  • AFP et Culture Box, La mort du grand journaliste et documentariste Henri de Turenne, France Info / Culture Box, 25/08/2016. Le journaliste et documentariste Henri de Turenne, l’un des grands noms de la presse et télévision française, est mort mardi dans son sommeil à l’âge de 94 ans, a-t-on appris jeudi auprès du jury du prix Albert Londres, dont il était membre.
  • Hervé Brusini, Henri de Turenne : les élégances du journalisme, France Info / Culture Box, 25/08/2016. « Ici, on sait qu’on arrive sur le front quand on vous tire dessus. » Tout le style de Turenne est là dans ces quelques mots. A la fois pure description, et distance ironique sur soi et sa condition de reporter. Rien de plus, rien de moins. Les élégances du journalisme.
  • Le journaliste Henri de Turenne est décédé, Le Figaro, 25/08/2016. DISPARITION – Le membre du jury du prix Albert Londres est mort dans son sommeil à l’âge de 94 ans. Journaliste et documentariste, il était connu pour ses reportages de guerres.
  • Antoine Perraud, Henri de Turenne (1921-2016), journaliste de l’affranchissement, Mediapart, 25/08/2016. Henri de Turenne, mort à 94 ans dans la nuit du 23 au 24 août, ne saurait être résumé à sa particule ou à sa diction patricienne : ce grand reporter puis fabuleux grognard de la télévision était un partageur aux aguets. Toujours partant pour faire connaître le réel, histoire que reculent l’ignorance, la démagogie, donc l’intolérance…

Page Wikipedia : Henri de Turenne (scénariste)

Image « à la une » : Henri de Turenne © DR

Mei Feng Mok: « Negotiating Community and Nation in Chợ Lớn: Nation-building, Community-building and Transnationalism in Everyday Life during the Republic of Việt Nam, 1955-1975 »

[ndlr] Présentation par Christoph Giebel de la thèse de Mei Feng Mok sur Cholon et sa population sous la République du Viêt-Nam de 1955 à 1975. Chronique publiée avec l’autorisation de son auteur.

Ref.: Mei Feng Mok, Negotiating Community and Nation in Chợ Lớn: Nation-building, Community-building and Transnationalism in Everyday Life during the Republic of Việt Nam, 1955-1975, University of Washington, History, PhD thesis, Chair: Christoph Giebel, 2016.

It is with great pleasure that I announce to VSG a newly minted Ph.D.

On 8 June 2016, at the History department of the University of Washington, Seattle (USA), Mei Feng Mok successfully defended her dissertation « Negotiating Community and Nation in Chợ Lớn: Nation-building, Community-building and Transnationalism in Everyday Life during the Republic of Việt Nam, 1955-1975. »  The dissertation is based on a variety of sources in Vietnamese, Chinese, French and English, most notably rare and rarely-used Chinese-language newspapers from Chợ Lớn.  Examiners were Laurie Sears, Sasha Welland, and Christoph Giebel (chair);  Moon-ho Jung and Madeleine Dong added guidance at earlier stages of research.  Before coming to UW, Mei Feng Mok earned an MA in History at the National University of Singapore (NUS) with Bruce Lockhart.

Focusing on social life ordered around markets, native place congregations and temples, schools and work places, hospitals and medicinal halls, sports clubs and restaurants, private homes and public leisure places, Mei Feng deftly provides a rich tapestry of Chợ Lớn’s Chinese community, particularly its middle class, and the changes it underwent over time.  She situates Chợ Lớn in multiple relations: as one center of greater Sài Gòn, economic conduit for the southern Vietnamese hinterlands, socio-cultural hub for Chinese communities throughout Indochina, nodal point in transnational Chinese exchanges linking San Francisco, Hong Kong, China, and Singapore, and contributor to Cold War-era and Taiwan/ROC-centric sinophonic articulations.

The dissertation is organized into four main chapters:  

  • 1) Chợ Lớn’s built environment and human geography, its lived and shared spaces;  
  • 2) Education from kindergarten to adult learning between local and transnational networks and the state;  
  • 3) Sports and competitions over disciplining bodies and controlling social time;  
  • and 4) young adulthood, women in the public sphere, and socialization into multi-layered networks through marriage, work, philanthropy, and other ways of accumulating and spending social capital. 

Here Chợ Lớn emerges as a site of contestation between diasporic community interests, a « nation-building » Vietnamese state, and the transnational Chinese world not easily negotiated by individuals and further complicated by war, violence, and ideological divisions.

 Mei Feng’s work is bound to make significant contributions to a variety of fields:  e.g., to social history (and here everyday urban life) of which Việt Nam Studies are still desperately starved, to the growing body of studies on the Republic of Việt Nam (and a rare one where the RVN simply « is » rather than « fails »), to conversations about diasporic/minority communities with multiple identities in Việt Nam (and elsewhere), and to our knowledge of overseas Chinese and the dynamic currents in the Cold War-era transnational Chinese world.  Mei Feng will now take her talents and work to a Post-doctoral Fellowship position at the Asia Research Institute (ARI) in Singapore (NUS) where this important and exciting dissertation may well turn into a marvelous book.

 
Congratulations to Dr. Mei Feng Mok!
 
C. Giebel

UW-Seattle

Source : VSG

Image « à la une » : Le marché de Binh Tây à Cholon en 1960.

Brenda M. Boyle and Jeehyun Lim, eds.: Looking Back on the Vietnam War – Twenty-First Century Perspectives

[ndlr] Parution d’un ouvrage collectif dans lequel les perspectives vietnamiennes sont prépondérantes. Présentation de l’éditeur.

LookingBackOnTheVietnamWarMore than forty years have passed since the official end of the Vietnam War, yet the war’s legacies endure. Its history and iconography still provide fodder for film and fiction, communities of war refugees have spawned a wide Vietnamese diaspora, and the United States military remains embroiled in unwinnable wars with eerie echoes of Vietnam.

Looking Back on the Vietnam War brings together scholars from a broad variety of disciplines, who offer fresh insights on the war’s psychological, economic, artistic, political, and environmental impacts. Each essay examines a different facet of the war, from its representation in Marvel comic books to the experiences of Vietnamese soldiers exposed to Agent Orange. By putting these pieces together, the contributors assemble an expansive yet nuanced composite portrait of the war and its global legacies.

Though they come from diverse scholarly backgrounds, ranging from anthropology to film studies, the contributors are united in their commitment to original research. Whether exploring rare archives or engaging in extensive interviews, they voice perspectives that have been excluded from standard historical accounts. Looking Back on the Vietnam War thus embarks on an interdisciplinary and international investigation to discover what we remember about the war, how we remember it, and why.

Contributors

Brenda Boyle, Jeehyun Lim, Yen Le Espiritu, Quan Tue Tran, Viet Thanh Nguyen, Lan Duong, Vinh Nguyen, Robert Mason, Leonie Jones, Heonik Kwon, Diane Niblack Fox, Cathy Schlund-Vials

Table Of Contents

Chronology

Note on the Text

Introduction: Looking Back at the Vietnam War / Brenda M. Boyle and Jeehyun Lim

  • Chapter 1: Vietnamese Refugees and Internet Memorials: When Does War End and Who Gets to Decide? / Yên Lê Espiritu
  • Chapter 2: Broken, but Not Forsaken: Disabled South Vietnamese Veterans in Vietnam and the Vietnamese Diaspora / Quan Tue Tran
  • Chapter 3: What Is Vietnamese American Literature? / Viet Thanh Nguyen
  • Chapter 4: Viet Nam and the Diaspora: Absence, Presence, and the Archive / Lan Duong
  • Chapter 5: Liberal Humanitarianism and Post–Cold War Cultural Politics: The Case of Le Ly Hayslip / Jeehyun Lim
  • Chapter 6: Ann Hui’s Boat People: Documenting Vietnamese Refugees in Hong Kong / Vinh Nguyen
  • Chapter 7: “The Deep Black Hole”: Vietnam in the Memories of Australian Veterans and Refugees / Robert Mason and Leonie Jones
  • Chapter 8: Missing Bodies and Homecoming Spirits / Heonik Kwon
  • Chapter 9: Agent Orange: Toxic Chemical, Narrative of Suffering, Metaphor for War / Diane Niblack Fox
  • Chapter 10: Re-Seeing Cambodia and Recollecting The ’Nam: A Vertiginous Critique of the Military Sublime / Cathy J. Schlund-Vials
  • Chapter 11: Naturalizing War: The Stories We Tell about the Vietnam War / Brenda M. Boyle

Appendix A: Archives

Appendix B: Publications since 2000

Notes on Contributors

Index

Source : Rutgers University Press